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What kind of guy does Sharapova like? A question in Spanish. I guess she likes Nadal as she is in Sp
Dartagnan
#1 Posted : Sunday, November 23, 2008 7:17:45 AM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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What kind of guy does Sharapova like? Good question in Spanish. I guess she likes Nadal as she is in Spain




 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Judahfist
#2 Posted : Sunday, November 23, 2008 2:23:20 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

[quote user="Dartagnan"]

What kind of guy does Sharapova like? Good question in Spanish. I guess she likes Nadal as she is in Spain


 


IN WHICH CASE SHE WOULD BE FRAUDING THE RUSSIAN 2K!!!


GODDAMN IT, SHE LIKES THE EMPEROR & ONLY THE EMPEROR.


 




 

[/quote]
Nero
#10 Posted : Sunday, November 23, 2008 6:10:59 PM(UTC)
Nero

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 62

[quote user="Judahfist"]

GODDAMN IT, SHE LIKES THE EMPEROR & ONLY THE EMPEROR.[/quote]
That she does.. that she doe :D

Judahfist
#3 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 2:47:12 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

[quote user="Nero"][quote user="Judahfist"]

GODDAMN IT, SHE LIKES THE EMPEROR & ONLY THE EMPEROR.[/quote]
That she does.. that she doe :D


[/quote]


 


 


IN WHICH CASE YOUR ARE CLEARLY THE GODDAMN INFIDEL


 



















Left, David Frank/The New York Times; University of Notre Dame


Dick Ebersol, the chairman of NBC Sports, left, and his son Charles, 21, were injured in the plane crash



A LOT OF GODDAMN HOMOS CAME TO SUPPORT YOU & YOUR GODDAMN BITCH FAGGOT FATHER.  YOU FAGGOT SODOMITE SONS COULD NOT PROTECT YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER & YOUR GODDAMN BROTHER.


 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 












ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER
Documentary filmmaker Charlie Ebersol talks to students at All Saints' Academy on Thursday in Winter Haven. His film "Ithuteng (Never Stop Learning)" is about the Ithuteng Trust school in Soweto, South Africa.




  




 


Published Saturday, January 14, 2006


document.title = unescape("Young%20Filmmakers%20Explain%20Journey") + " | theledger.com";


Young Filmmakers Explain Journey


Sons of executive at NBC also talk about losing brother in 2004 plane crash.

By RACHEL PLEASANT
The Ledger

WINTER HAVEN -- Two sons of a prominent network TV executive who lost their younger brother in a plane crash more than a year ago were at All Saints' Academy on Friday to tell students their experiences in making a documentary film in South Africa.

During the hour-long session with about 350 students, Charlie and Willie Ebersol shared thoughts, fears and anecdotes about the process of filming a documentary about the successful
Ithuteng Trust School in Soweto, South Africa, a place where most students are either criminals or victims of crime.

Their feelings about the death of 14-year-old Edward "Teddy" Ebersol are just under the surface of everything they do.

"In America there's a really common thing -- a grieving period where you cry for a little while and then you get back to normal," Charlie, 23, a recent University of Notre Dame graduate, told the crowd, recalling a moment in Africa when his brother, Willie, tried to comfort a crying child.

"They said that she needed to cry it out, to deal with her emotions all the way," Charlie said. "I needed to cry this out and experience the pain. I had to move past it in a certain way. I learned to be honest about our pain."

On Nov. 28, 2004, Charlie and Teddy and their father, Dick Ebersol, were among six people on board a jet plane that crashed while taking off during a snow storm from the airport in the small town of Montrose, about 185 miles southwest of Denver.

Charlie and Dick Ebersol survived, but Teddy and two crewmen died in the crash.

Dick Ebersol is head of NBC Sports and is known for his love of the Olympics. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

After Friday's meeting with students, Charlie recalled the events of that November day and talked about the healing process that has followed.

Just before the plane crashed, Charlie Ebersol said Teddy was watching a DVD recapping the Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series win.

As the plane was going down, Charlie Ebersol said while making a nosedive gesture with his hand, Teddy turned to his father and said, "Dad, I'm scared."

In memory of their brother, Charlie and Willie wear rubber bracelets imprinted with a line Teddy included in a speech he made at school: "The finish line is the beginning of a whole new race."

Those, and other words written by Teddy are especially meaningful to the brothers.

"He wrote a 36-page autobiography that said any member of my family would run into a burning building to save another member," Charlie said. "He said that on the highway of love, my family is neck and neck with God."

Willie, 19, a sophomore at the
University of Southern California, said has found comfort in how fully his brother lived in such a short time.

"He lived a complete arc," Willie Ebersol said, saying that seeing the Red Sox become world champions was a
high point for his brother. "I believe he died having finished everything that was important to him.

"We used to fight all the time and he taught me that if you really love someone, you have to work on it. You have to work really hard because you don't want to be mad at someone you love."

The brothers are traveling the country talking about their
South Africa documentary, which will air on HBO in October.

The documentary, which cost $23,000 to make, has already raised more than $1 million to benefit the
Ithuteng Trust School. The film follows three students who attend the school and the peril of their everyday lives.

The documentary caught the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who recently featured the young filmmakers on her show.

To illustrate the dangerous conditions children in
Soweto live in, the brothers' filmmaking partner Kip Kroeger used the statistic that every 23 seconds a rape is committed in South Africa.

Kroeger said one of the most striking economic disparities he discovered in
South Africa is that just minutes from the Ithuteng school, where children have experienced unimaginable violence and hunger, there is a Ferrari dealership.

Thanks to money raised from the documentary, the school is building dorms, a cafeteria and swimming pool.

If the money is managed correctly, the school will have water, food and electricity for years to come.

The Ebersol brothers are moving on to other projects.

Willie is working for breast cancer awareness and is looking for another documentary subject he feels passionately about. Charlie will soon begin directing a movie with actor Dennis Quaid.

They also are working to partner high schools and colleges in the
United States with sister schools in Africa.


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 


 


Body of NBC Official's Son Is Believed Found in Crash


By RICHARD SANDOMIR and MATTHEW L. WALD

Published: November 30, 2004
















Jennifer Graylock/Associated Press
The body of Edward Ebersol, 14, was said to have been recovered Monday in Montrose, Colo.














ARTICLE TOOLS







Email This Article
E-Mail This Article

Printer Friendly Format
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Reprints & Permissions


















TIMES NEWS TRACKER





Judahfist
#4 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 2:48:01 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

[quote user="Nero"][quote user="Judahfist"]

GODDAMN IT, SHE LIKES THE EMPEROR & ONLY THE EMPEROR.[/quote]
That she does.. that she doe :D


[/quote]


 


 


IN WHICH CASE YOUR ARE CLEARLY THE GODDAMN INFIDEL


 



















Left, David Frank/The New York Times; University of Notre Dame


Dick Ebersol, the chairman of NBC Sports, left, and his son Charles, 21, were injured in the plane crash



A LOT OF GODDAMN HOMOS CAME TO SUPPORT YOU & YOUR GODDAMN BITCH FAGGOT FATHER.  YOU FAGGOT SODOMITE SONS COULD NOT PROTECT YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER & YOUR GODDAMN BROTHER.


 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 












ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER
Documentary filmmaker Charlie Ebersol talks to students at All Saints' Academy on Thursday in Winter Haven. His film "Ithuteng (Never Stop Learning)" is about the Ithuteng Trust school in Soweto, South Africa.




  




 


Published Saturday, January 14, 2006


document.title = unescape("Young%20Filmmakers%20Explain%20Journey") + " | theledger.com";


Young Filmmakers Explain Journey


Sons of executive at NBC also talk about losing brother in 2004 plane crash.

By RACHEL PLEASANT
The Ledger

WINTER HAVEN -- Two sons of a prominent network TV executive who lost their younger brother in a plane crash more than a year ago were at All Saints' Academy on Friday to tell students their experiences in making a documentary film in South Africa.

During the hour-long session with about 350 students, Charlie and Willie Ebersol shared thoughts, fears and anecdotes about the process of filming a documentary about the successful
Ithuteng Trust School in Soweto, South Africa, a place where most students are either criminals or victims of crime.

Their feelings about the death of 14-year-old Edward "Teddy" Ebersol are just under the surface of everything they do.

"In America there's a really common thing -- a grieving period where you cry for a little while and then you get back to normal," Charlie, 23, a recent University of Notre Dame graduate, told the crowd, recalling a moment in Africa when his brother, Willie, tried to comfort a crying child.

"They said that she needed to cry it out, to deal with her emotions all the way," Charlie said. "I needed to cry this out and experience the pain. I had to move past it in a certain way. I learned to be honest about our pain."

On Nov. 28, 2004, Charlie and Teddy and their father, Dick Ebersol, were among six people on board a jet plane that crashed while taking off during a snow storm from the airport in the small town of Montrose, about 185 miles southwest of Denver.

Charlie and Dick Ebersol survived, but Teddy and two crewmen died in the crash.

Dick Ebersol is head of NBC Sports and is known for his love of the Olympics. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

After Friday's meeting with students, Charlie recalled the events of that November day and talked about the healing process that has followed.

Just before the plane crashed, Charlie Ebersol said Teddy was watching a DVD recapping the Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series win.

As the plane was going down, Charlie Ebersol said while making a nosedive gesture with his hand, Teddy turned to his father and said, "Dad, I'm scared."

In memory of their brother, Charlie and Willie wear rubber bracelets imprinted with a line Teddy included in a speech he made at school: "The finish line is the beginning of a whole new race."

Those, and other words written by Teddy are especially meaningful to the brothers.

"He wrote a 36-page autobiography that said any member of my family would run into a burning building to save another member," Charlie said. "He said that on the highway of love, my family is neck and neck with God."

Willie, 19, a sophomore at the
University of Southern California, said has found comfort in how fully his brother lived in such a short time.

"He lived a complete arc," Willie Ebersol said, saying that seeing the Red Sox become world champions was a
high point for his brother. "I believe he died having finished everything that was important to him.

"We used to fight all the time and he taught me that if you really love someone, you have to work on it. You have to work really hard because you don't want to be mad at someone you love."

The brothers are traveling the country talking about their
South Africa documentary, which will air on HBO in October.

The documentary, which cost $23,000 to make, has already raised more than $1 million to benefit the
Ithuteng Trust School. The film follows three students who attend the school and the peril of their everyday lives.

The documentary caught the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who recently featured the young filmmakers on her show.

To illustrate the dangerous conditions children in
Soweto live in, the brothers' filmmaking partner Kip Kroeger used the statistic that every 23 seconds a rape is committed in South Africa.

Kroeger said one of the most striking economic disparities he discovered in
South Africa is that just minutes from the Ithuteng school, where children have experienced unimaginable violence and hunger, there is a Ferrari dealership.

Thanks to money raised from the documentary, the school is building dorms, a cafeteria and swimming pool.

If the money is managed correctly, the school will have water, food and electricity for years to come.

The Ebersol brothers are moving on to other projects.

Willie is working for breast cancer awareness and is looking for another documentary subject he feels passionately about. Charlie will soon begin directing a movie with actor Dennis Quaid.

They also are working to partner high schools and colleges in the
United States with sister schools in Africa.


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 


 


Body of NBC Official's Son Is Believed Found in Crash


By RICHARD SANDOMIR and MATTHEW L. WALD

Published: November 30, 2004
















Jennifer Graylock/Associated Press
The body of Edward Ebersol, 14, was said to have been recovered Monday in Montrose, Colo.














ARTICLE TOOLS







Email This Article
E-Mail This Article

Printer Friendly Format
Printer-Friendly Format

Most E-mailed Articles
Most E-Mailed Articles

Reprints & Permissions
Judahfist
#5 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 2:54:46 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 











ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER
Documentary filmmaker Charlie Ebersol talks to students at All Saints' Academy on Thursday in Winter Haven. His film "Ithuteng (Never Stop Learning)" is about the Ithuteng Trust school in Soweto, South Africa.




  




 


Published Saturday, January 14, 2006


document.title = unescape("Young%20Filmmakers%20Explain%20Journey") + " | theledger.com";


Young Filmmakers Explain Journey


Sons of executive at NBC also talk about losing brother in 2004 plane crash.

By RACHEL PLEASANT
The Ledger

WINTER HAVEN -- Two sons of a prominent network TV executive who lost their younger brother in a plane crash more than a year ago were at All Saints' Academy on Friday to tell students their experiences in making a documentary film in South Africa.

During the hour-long session with about 350 students, Charlie and Willie Ebersol shared thoughts, fears and anecdotes about the process of filming a documentary about the successful
Ithuteng Trust School in Soweto, South Africa, a place where most students are either criminals or victims of crime.

Their feelings about the death of 14-year-old Edward "Teddy" Ebersol are just under the surface of everything they do.

"In America there's a really common thing -- a grieving period where you cry for a little while and then you get back to normal," Charlie, 23, a recent University of Notre Dame graduate, told the crowd, recalling a moment in Africa when his brother, Willie, tried to comfort a crying child.

"They said that she needed to cry it out, to deal with her emotions all the way," Charlie said. "I needed to cry this out and experience the pain. I had to move past it in a certain way. I learned to be honest about our pain."

On Nov. 28, 2004, Charlie and Teddy and their father, Dick Ebersol, were among six people on board a jet plane that crashed while taking off during a snow storm from the airport in the small town of Montrose, about 185 miles southwest of Denver.

Charlie and Dick Ebersol survived, but Teddy and two crewmen died in the crash.

Dick Ebersol is head of NBC Sports and is known for his love of the Olympics. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

After Friday's meeting with students, Charlie recalled the events of that November day and talked about the healing process that has followed.

Just before the plane crashed, Charlie Ebersol said Teddy was watching a DVD recapping the Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series win.

As the plane was going down, Charlie Ebersol said while making a nosedive gesture with his hand, Teddy turned to his father and said, "Dad, I'm scared."

In memory of their brother, Charlie and Willie wear rubber bracelets imprinted with a line Teddy included in a speech he made at school: "The finish line is the beginning of a whole new race."

Those, and other words written by Teddy are especially meaningful to the brothers.

"He wrote a 36-page autobiography that said any member of my family would run into a burning building to save another member," Charlie said. "He said that on the highway of love, my family is neck and neck with God."

Willie, 19, a sophomore at the
University of Southern California, said has found comfort in how fully his brother lived in such a short time.

"He lived a complete arc," Willie Ebersol said, saying that seeing the Red Sox become world champions was a
high point for his brother. "I believe he died having finished everything that was important to him.

"We used to fight all the time and he taught me that if you really love someone, you have to work on it. You have to work really hard because you don't want to be mad at someone you love."

The brothers are traveling the country talking about their
South Africa documentary, which will air on HBO in October.

The documentary, which cost $23,000 to make, has already raised more than $1 million to benefit the
Ithuteng Trust School. The film follows three students who attend the school and the peril of their everyday lives.

The documentary caught the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who recently featured the young filmmakers on her show.

To illustrate the dangerous conditions children in
Soweto live in, the brothers' filmmaking partner Kip Kroeger used the statistic that every 23 seconds a rape is committed in South Africa.

Kroeger said one of the most striking economic disparities he discovered in
South Africa is that just minutes from the Ithuteng school, where children have experienced unimaginable violence and hunger, there is a Ferrari dealership.

Thanks to money raised from the documentary, the school is building dorms, a cafeteria and swimming pool.

If the money is managed correctly, the school will have water, food and electricity for years to come.

The Ebersol brothers are moving on to other projects.

Willie is working for breast cancer awareness and is looking for another documentary subject he feels passionately about. Charlie will soon begin directing a movie with actor Dennis Quaid.

They also are working to partner high schools and colleges in the
United States with sister schools in Africa.


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 



 


 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 

Judahfist
#6 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 2:58:34 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

[quote user="Judahfist"]

 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 











ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER
Documentary filmmaker Charlie Ebersol talks to students at All Saints' Academy on Thursday in Winter Haven. His film "Ithuteng (Never Stop Learning)" is about the Ithuteng Trust school in Soweto, South Africa.




  




 


Published Saturday, January 14, 2006


document.title = unescape("Young%20Filmmakers%20Explain%20Journey") + " | theledger.com";


Young Filmmakers Explain Journey


Sons of executive at NBC also talk about losing brother in 2004 plane crash.

By RACHEL PLEASANT
The Ledger

WINTER HAVEN -- Two sons of a prominent network TV executive who lost their younger brother in a plane crash more than a year ago were at All Saints' Academy on Friday to tell students their experiences in making a documentary film in South Africa.

During the hour-long session with about 350 students, Charlie and Willie Ebersol shared thoughts, fears and anecdotes about the process of filming a documentary about the successful
Ithuteng Trust School in Soweto, South Africa, a place where most students are either criminals or victims of crime.

Their feelings about the death of 14-year-old Edward "Teddy" Ebersol are just under the surface of everything they do.

"In America there's a really common thing -- a grieving period where you cry for a little while and then you get back to normal," Charlie, 23, a recent University of Notre Dame graduate, told the crowd, recalling a moment in Africa when his brother, Willie, tried to comfort a crying child.

"They said that she needed to cry it out, to deal with her emotions all the way," Charlie said. "I needed to cry this out and experience the pain. I had to move past it in a certain way. I learned to be honest about our pain."

On Nov. 28, 2004, Charlie and Teddy and their father, Dick Ebersol, were among six people on board a jet plane that crashed while taking off during a snow storm from the airport in the small town of Montrose, about 185 miles southwest of Denver.

Charlie and Dick Ebersol survived, but Teddy and two crewmen died in the crash.

Dick Ebersol is head of NBC Sports and is known for his love of the Olympics. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

After Friday's meeting with students, Charlie recalled the events of that November day and talked about the healing process that has followed.

Just before the plane crashed, Charlie Ebersol said Teddy was watching a DVD recapping the Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series win.

As the plane was going down, Charlie Ebersol said while making a nosedive gesture with his hand, Teddy turned to his father and said, "Dad, I'm scared."

In memory of their brother, Charlie and Willie wear rubber bracelets imprinted with a line Teddy included in a speech he made at school: "The finish line is the beginning of a whole new race."

Those, and other words written by Teddy are especially meaningful to the brothers.

"He wrote a 36-page autobiography that said any member of my family would run into a burning building to save another member," Charlie said. "He said that on the highway of love, my family is neck and neck with God."

Willie, 19, a sophomore at the
University of Southern California, said has found comfort in how fully his brother lived in such a short time.

"He lived a complete arc," Willie Ebersol said, saying that seeing the Red Sox become world champions was a
high point for his brother. "I believe he died having finished everything that was important to him.

"We used to fight all the time and he taught me that if you really love someone, you have to work on it. You have to work really hard because you don't want to be mad at someone you love."

The brothers are traveling the country talking about their
South Africa documentary, which will air on HBO in October.

The documentary, which cost $23,000 to make, has already raised more than $1 million to benefit the
Ithuteng Trust School. The film follows three students who attend the school and the peril of their everyday lives.

The documentary caught the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who recently featured the young filmmakers on her show.

To illustrate the dangerous conditions children in
Soweto live in, the brothers' filmmaking partner Kip Kroeger used the statistic that every 23 seconds a rape is committed in South Africa.

Kroeger said one of the most striking economic disparities he discovered in
South Africa is that just minutes from the Ithuteng school, where children have experienced unimaginable violence and hunger, there is a Ferrari dealership.

Thanks to money raised from the documentary, the school is building dorms, a cafeteria and swimming pool.

If the money is managed correctly, the school will have water, food and electricity for years to come.

The Ebersol brothers are moving on to other projects.

Willie is working for breast cancer awareness and is looking for another documentary subject he feels passionately about. Charlie will soon begin directing a movie with actor Dennis Quaid.

They also are working to partner high schools and colleges in the
United States with sister schools in Africa.


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 



 


 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 


[/quote]


 


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 


 

Judahfist
#7 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 3:01:13 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

[quote user="Judahfist"][quote user="Judahfist"]

 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 











ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER
Documentary filmmaker Charlie Ebersol talks to students at All Saints' Academy on Thursday in Winter Haven. His film "Ithuteng (Never Stop Learning)" is about the Ithuteng Trust school in Soweto, South Africa.




  




 


Published Saturday, January 14, 2006


document.title = unescape("Young%20Filmmakers%20Explain%20Journey") + " | theledger.com";


Young Filmmakers Explain Journey


Sons of executive at NBC also talk about losing brother in 2004 plane crash.

By RACHEL PLEASANT
The Ledger

WINTER HAVEN -- Two sons of a prominent network TV executive who lost their younger brother in a plane crash more than a year ago were at All Saints' Academy on Friday to tell students their experiences in making a documentary film in South Africa.

During the hour-long session with about 350 students, Charlie and Willie Ebersol shared thoughts, fears and anecdotes about the process of filming a documentary about the successful
Ithuteng Trust School in Soweto, South Africa, a place where most students are either criminals or victims of crime.

Their feelings about the death of 14-year-old Edward "Teddy" Ebersol are just under the surface of everything they do.

"In America there's a really common thing -- a grieving period where you cry for a little while and then you get back to normal," Charlie, 23, a recent University of Notre Dame graduate, told the crowd, recalling a moment in Africa when his brother, Willie, tried to comfort a crying child.

"They said that she needed to cry it out, to deal with her emotions all the way," Charlie said. "I needed to cry this out and experience the pain. I had to move past it in a certain way. I learned to be honest about our pain."

On Nov. 28, 2004, Charlie and Teddy and their father, Dick Ebersol, were among six people on board a jet plane that crashed while taking off during a snow storm from the airport in the small town of Montrose, about 185 miles southwest of Denver.

Charlie and Dick Ebersol survived, but Teddy and two crewmen died in the crash.

Dick Ebersol is head of NBC Sports and is known for his love of the Olympics. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

After Friday's meeting with students, Charlie recalled the events of that November day and talked about the healing process that has followed.

Just before the plane crashed, Charlie Ebersol said Teddy was watching a DVD recapping the Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series win.

As the plane was going down, Charlie Ebersol said while making a nosedive gesture with his hand, Teddy turned to his father and said, "Dad, I'm scared."

In memory of their brother, Charlie and Willie wear rubber bracelets imprinted with a line Teddy included in a speech he made at school: "The finish line is the beginning of a whole new race."

Those, and other words written by Teddy are especially meaningful to the brothers.

"He wrote a 36-page autobiography that said any member of my family would run into a burning building to save another member," Charlie said. "He said that on the highway of love, my family is neck and neck with God."

Willie, 19, a sophomore at the
University of Southern California, said has found comfort in how fully his brother lived in such a short time.

"He lived a complete arc," Willie Ebersol said, saying that seeing the Red Sox become world champions was a
high point for his brother. "I believe he died having finished everything that was important to him.

"We used to fight all the time and he taught me that if you really love someone, you have to work on it. You have to work really hard because you don't want to be mad at someone you love."

The brothers are traveling the country talking about their
South Africa documentary, which will air on HBO in October.

The documentary, which cost $23,000 to make, has already raised more than $1 million to benefit the
Ithuteng Trust School. The film follows three students who attend the school and the peril of their everyday lives.

The documentary caught the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who recently featured the young filmmakers on her show.

To illustrate the dangerous conditions children in
Soweto live in, the brothers' filmmaking partner Kip Kroeger used the statistic that every 23 seconds a rape is committed in South Africa.

Kroeger said one of the most striking economic disparities he discovered in
South Africa is that just minutes from the Ithuteng school, where children have experienced unimaginable violence and hunger, there is a Ferrari dealership.

Thanks to money raised from the documentary, the school is building dorms, a cafeteria and swimming pool.

If the money is managed correctly, the school will have water, food and electricity for years to come.

The Ebersol brothers are moving on to other projects.

Willie is working for breast cancer awareness and is looking for another documentary subject he feels passionately about. Charlie will soon begin directing a movie with actor Dennis Quaid.

They also are working to partner high schools and colleges in the
United States with sister schools in Africa.


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 



 


 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 


[/quote]


 


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 


 


[/quote]


CHARLIE CAUGHT KNEELING ON THE JOB!!!


 


LITERALLY!!!


 


Judahfist
#8 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 3:03:10 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: everyone, registered users, Registered
Joined: 1/10/2011(UTC)
Posts: 125

[quote user="Judahfist"][quote user="Judahfist"][quote user="Judahfist"]

 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 











ERNST PETERS/THE LEDGER
Documentary filmmaker Charlie Ebersol talks to students at All Saints' Academy on Thursday in Winter Haven. His film "Ithuteng (Never Stop Learning)" is about the Ithuteng Trust school in Soweto, South Africa.




  




 


Published Saturday, January 14, 2006


document.title = unescape("Young%20Filmmakers%20Explain%20Journey") + " | theledger.com";


Young Filmmakers Explain Journey


Sons of executive at NBC also talk about losing brother in 2004 plane crash.

By RACHEL PLEASANT
The Ledger

WINTER HAVEN -- Two sons of a prominent network TV executive who lost their younger brother in a plane crash more than a year ago were at All Saints' Academy on Friday to tell students their experiences in making a documentary film in South Africa.

During the hour-long session with about 350 students, Charlie and Willie Ebersol shared thoughts, fears and anecdotes about the process of filming a documentary about the successful
Ithuteng Trust School in Soweto, South Africa, a place where most students are either criminals or victims of crime.

Their feelings about the death of 14-year-old Edward "Teddy" Ebersol are just under the surface of everything they do.

"In America there's a really common thing -- a grieving period where you cry for a little while and then you get back to normal," Charlie, 23, a recent University of Notre Dame graduate, told the crowd, recalling a moment in Africa when his brother, Willie, tried to comfort a crying child.

"They said that she needed to cry it out, to deal with her emotions all the way," Charlie said. "I needed to cry this out and experience the pain. I had to move past it in a certain way. I learned to be honest about our pain."

On Nov. 28, 2004, Charlie and Teddy and their father, Dick Ebersol, were among six people on board a jet plane that crashed while taking off during a snow storm from the airport in the small town of Montrose, about 185 miles southwest of Denver.

Charlie and Dick Ebersol survived, but Teddy and two crewmen died in the crash.

Dick Ebersol is head of NBC Sports and is known for his love of the Olympics. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

After Friday's meeting with students, Charlie recalled the events of that November day and talked about the healing process that has followed.

Just before the plane crashed, Charlie Ebersol said Teddy was watching a DVD recapping the Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series win.

As the plane was going down, Charlie Ebersol said while making a nosedive gesture with his hand, Teddy turned to his father and said, "Dad, I'm scared."

In memory of their brother, Charlie and Willie wear rubber bracelets imprinted with a line Teddy included in a speech he made at school: "The finish line is the beginning of a whole new race."

Those, and other words written by Teddy are especially meaningful to the brothers.

"He wrote a 36-page autobiography that said any member of my family would run into a burning building to save another member," Charlie said. "He said that on the highway of love, my family is neck and neck with God."

Willie, 19, a sophomore at the
University of Southern California, said has found comfort in how fully his brother lived in such a short time.

"He lived a complete arc," Willie Ebersol said, saying that seeing the Red Sox become world champions was a
high point for his brother. "I believe he died having finished everything that was important to him.

"We used to fight all the time and he taught me that if you really love someone, you have to work on it. You have to work really hard because you don't want to be mad at someone you love."

The brothers are traveling the country talking about their
South Africa documentary, which will air on HBO in October.

The documentary, which cost $23,000 to make, has already raised more than $1 million to benefit the
Ithuteng Trust School. The film follows three students who attend the school and the peril of their everyday lives.

The documentary caught the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who recently featured the young filmmakers on her show.

To illustrate the dangerous conditions children in
Soweto live in, the brothers' filmmaking partner Kip Kroeger used the statistic that every 23 seconds a rape is committed in South Africa.

Kroeger said one of the most striking economic disparities he discovered in
South Africa is that just minutes from the Ithuteng school, where children have experienced unimaginable violence and hunger, there is a Ferrari dealership.

Thanks to money raised from the documentary, the school is building dorms, a cafeteria and swimming pool.

If the money is managed correctly, the school will have water, food and electricity for years to come.

The Ebersol brothers are moving on to other projects.

Willie is working for breast cancer awareness and is looking for another documentary subject he feels passionately about. Charlie will soon begin directing a movie with actor Dennis Quaid.

They also are working to partner high schools and colleges in the
United States with sister schools in Africa.


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 



 


 


LOOK AT YOU YOU D!CK SUCKER!!!


 


 


[/quote]


 


 


YOU OBVIOUSLY DID NOT DO A GODDAMN THING TO HONOR YOUR GODDAMN MOTHER!!!


 


CLEARLY DUNCAN IS IN THE BUSINESS OF RAISING HIS B!ITCH BLOW BOYS


 


 


[/quote]


CHARLIE CAUGHT KNEELING ON THE JOB!!!


 


LITERALLY!!!


 



[/quote]


 


CHARLIE HAS A GODDMAN BIG WIDE SMILE!!!


THE GODDAMN ORAFACE OF ORATION IS A GODDAMN CONDEMNATION!!!


 


Judahfist
#9 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 3:12:02 PM(UTC)
Judahfist

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INTRODUCING THE SOFT THROATS


 



 








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Nero
#11 Posted : Thursday, November 27, 2008 6:35:54 PM(UTC)
Nero

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All that just to agree that Maria and I are dating? Wow totally cool
I am a better man than Charlie if that is what you want to hear
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