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Dartagnan
#75 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2013 7:35:25 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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Dartagnan: We MUST respect the historical events that is why we must not repeat the errors made during the beginning of the 20 century by leaders of some European countries. It is important to remember the past but it is more important not to repeat the errors of the past. 


Albert Einstein said: The World will not be destroyed by those that do evil; but by those who watch them without doing anything.



Greek footballer banned for life over Nazi salute (VIDEO)


http://youtu.be/T8nxFVF-jfw


Greek footballer banned for life over Nazi salute (VIDEO)




AEK Athens’ player Giorgos Katidis has been banned for life from playing for any national teams by Greece's soccer federation. The punishment followed his alleged Nazi salute given to fans to celebrate his winning goal in a domestic game.




The incident took place during a Super League AEK home game against Veria at the Athens Olympic Stadium on Saturday night, which was won by the hosts 2-1. The winner came in the 84th minute.


“The player’s action to salute to spectators in a Nazi manner is a severe provocation, insults all the victims of Nazi bestiality and injures the deeply pacifist and human character of the game,” the Greek soccer federation’s statement said.


The 20-year-old footballer in question denies it was a Nazi salute.


Dartagnan: This football player is an adult so he must know very well what he was doing. He used his right hand for the Nazi Salute that means he knew very well what he was doing. 


"I am not a fascist and would not have done it if I had known what it meant," the player wrote on his Twitter, adding that he was simply pointing at Michalis Pavlis in the stands to dedicate the goal to his team mate as he continues to fight health problems.


AEK's German coach Ewald Lienen backed Katidis.


"He is a young kid who does not have any political ideas. He most likely saw such a salute on the Internet or somewhere else and did it without knowing what it means," Lienen said, also stressing that the player was crying in the dressing room on seeing the reaction.


Katidis’ gesture met heavy criticism from political parties and fans on social media. March 17 marks the 70th anniversary of Greek-Jew deportations to Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War.


The footballer may still be allowed to play for his side. AEK have asked the midfielder to explain his behavior and will then decide his future at a board meeting next week. Katidis signed a four-year contract with the club in August 2012.


This is not the first time a Nazi gesture has landed footballers in trouble. In December 2005, Lazio forward Paolo di Canio was fined €10,000 and sidelined for one domestic game for a Hitler-style salute to his team’s fans in a match against Livorno.



RT


"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#76 Posted : Thursday, April 04, 2013 3:56:03 PM(UTC)
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Russia on Her Mind — Adopted US Paralympic Champ to Return Home


      


COLORADO SPRINGS, April 2 (By Carl Schreck for RIA Novosti) – It was still dark outside when Jessica Long ambled into the Olympic aquatic center on a recent morning wearing a pastel one-piece swimsuit and gray knee pads to shield the stumps of her legs from the poolside concrete.


One earbud was tucked into place as she fiddled with her iPod. The other dangled below her shoulders alongside her blonde hair, leaving her right ear to absorb her teammates’ muffled small talk in the cavernous swim hall here at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.


Long’s soundtrack that morning was lighter fare than the Eminem and Lil Wayne she blasted in her formative years. These days, the mellower oeuvres of indie bands like Mumford & Sons and Imagine Dragons provide the necessary motivation for her pre-dawn workouts at the US Olympic Training Center in this sleepy town 6,000 feet (1,829 meters) above sea level.


Long, who at 21 has become arguably the most dominant Paralympic swimmer of her generation, is not a morning person. And the shrill yelps of her fellow swimmers as they hit the water were not exactly encouraging.


 


“That pool is not warm, especially during the winter,” Long told RIA Novosti in an interview at the Olympic training complex. “When it’s cold outside, it’s even colder. So I need something to kind of get me excited to jump in the pool.”


Aversion to cold might seem out of place for a young woman born deep in Siberia. Long spent the first 13 months of her life in an Irkutsk orphanage, where she was placed after doctors encouraged her teenage parents to give her up rather than try to raise a child born without lower leg bones.


Two decades later, armed with a handful of rudimentary Russian phrases and a lifetime of wondering, Long is preparing to return to Russia for the first time since she was adopted by a Baltimore couple to meet the biological family that until last year she never knew she had.


From Bratsk to Baltimore


Jessica Long was born Tatyana Olegovna Kirillova on February 29, 1992—a Leap Year baby—to an 18-year-old mother and a 17-year-old father in the remote industrial Siberian city of Bratsk. Born with fibular hemimelia, a congenital absence of lower-leg bones, she became a ward of the Russian state after her biological parents concluded they were unable to care for her.


“I was alone in Siberia, my mother and father weren’t around,” Long’s biological mother, Natalya Kirillova, said on a nationally broadcast Russian talk show last year. “I didn’t know where I would go if I would take her home.”


Kirillova gave birth to a second daughter, Anastasia, a year later, after which she said she went to the Irkutsk orphanage where Long was living intent on bringing her child home. It was too late. The girl had been adopted by Steve and Beth Long, a Baltimore couple and the parents of two biological children.


The Longs wanted more children, but doctors told them they would not be able to have any more of their own.


“We were hoping to adopt children with physical disabilities,” Steve Long told RIA Novosti. “We thought we could provide a good home and work with them to be fully productive in their lives.”


The Longs adopted another Russian child, Joshua, with a cleft lip and palate at the same orphanage. The doctors’ assessment of their reproductive capabilities proved imprecise: The couple went on to have two more children, bringing their brood to six.


“There was never a dull moment in my house,” Jessica Long said. “I mean, even to this day there’s always something going on.”


The remnants of Long’s malformed lower legs were attached just below her knees, making it difficult for her to wear prostheses. Doctors in the United States amputated her lower legs when she was 18 months old, and within two weeks she was moving around on artificial legs—albeit with a walker at first.


“It was always so natural to me,” Long said. “It was just like putting on a pair of shoes. … It’s just like wearing tall high heels.”


An irrepressibly active and competitive child, Long bounced around the family’s home like the Tasmanian Devil on a Red Bull binge.


“I used to do somersaults and flips all around the house,” Long said. “We had a trampoline, I would do backflips, and I would climb on top of the refrigerator and the bannister. I was always climbing on everything.”


To focus this energy, Long’s adoptive parents enrolled her in gymnastics when she was six years old. She enjoyed the sport, which did not require her to wear prosthetics, but it was not easy on her knees.


When she turned 10, her parents said that if she wanted to continue, she would have to do so while wearing her artificial legs, which had a penchant for popping out at inopportune times—including once on a ski lift.


“At 10 years old I’m thinking, ‘There is no way I want to be on the balance beam on these stilts … doing flips and whatnot,’” she recalled. “So we decided to find a sport that I could do without wearing my legs and still be active.”


Mermaid Dreams


For as long as she can remember Jessica Long was drawn to the water.


After church on Sundays, Long and her family would go to her grandparents’ house to frolic the afternoon away in the backyard swimming pool.


“That’s where my love for swimming really came about,” Long said. “ … I would pretend I was a mermaid, and, you know, I would go on all these adventures. I would swim with my eyes open until they were bloodshot.”


Growing up, Long strived to win at everything, however mundane the contest. Finishing her ice cream or making it through the front door—she had to be first. Knowing their sister’s hypercompetitive nature, Long’s siblings would occasionally tease her by sprinting to the designated finish line of the moment.


“I’d be like, ‘That’s not fair,’” she said.


The pool proved to be the great equalizer.


Long’s grandmother spotted a newspaper article about a local swim team, giving the 10-year-old a readymade replacement for gymnastics. She knew only two strokes when she showed up for swim practice, and the first time she tried the butterfly—now her best event—she says she feared she would drown. Soon, though, she was challenging and even beating her teammates who had full use of their arms and legs.


“I really loved, too, the way the girls treated me on the swim team,” Long said. “You know, I wasn’t just a girl without any legs. I was one of their competitors, and one of the girls who could even beat them.”


Two years after she started swimming competitively, Long surprised her family and coaches by securing a spot on the US national team for the 2004 Paralympics in Athens, Greece. Her family had tried to keep her expectations in check at the trials in Minneapolis, Minnesota, reminding her that she was only 12 years old.


“I just remember being like, ‘Noooo. I’m going to make it,’” she told RIA Novosti.


In Athens, she ended up capturing three gold medals, including a come-from-behind victory over Israeli world record holder Keren Leibovitch in the 100-meter freestyle. A career was born.


“It’s kind of where it all started,” Long said.


Long went on to capture four gold medals in Beijing in 2008, though she briefly considered retiring at age 16 because she had promised friends, family and reporters that she’d come home with seven. She won five more gold medals last year at the London Games, and she currently holds 15 world records.


One of her most memorable races, however, came just a few years after she started swimming when she competed against 85 able-bodied challengers in the 100-meter freestyle for her Baltimore club team. The shorter races put Long at a distinct disadvantage against able-bodied swimmers—fibulas and feet make the start and the foot turns considerably more efficient—but Long beat them all that day.


“That was really exciting,” she said.


Russia Calling


From the beginning Long’s parents were forthright with her about her adoption, and while she says she never felt like an outsider in her American family, she wanted to meet her birth mom from a young age.


“There was a time when I was like 15 or 16 that I really wasn’t sure that I’d ever find her, and then as I got older, it was more like, OK, actually I really do want to do this,” she said.


The spring before the London games, Long said in an interview broadcast on Russian television that she would like to meet her biological parents. Should such a reunion take place, however, Long wanted it to be after the Paralympics. She had gold medals to win.


Unbeknownst to Long, Viktoria Petrova, an intrepid reporter for state-owned television network Rossiya-1, was making potato pancakes in her kitchen when she saw the television report about the Russian adoptee turned swimming superstar.


Quickly grasping the human drama at the heart of the story, Petrova set off to find Long’s birth parents, the journalist wrote later on her personal blog.


Petrova’s search led her first to Irkutsk, then to Bratsk, then to the village of Tem—population 853—deep in the taiga. There she found Long’s biological parents, Natalya Kirillova and Oleg Valtyshev, who had married and were living with their children, Long’s biological siblings: 19-year-old Anastasia and 13-year-old twins Dasha and Igor.


The fate of the daughter she gave up had been a mystery to Kirillova. When Petrova showed Kirillova a video about Long’s athletic exploits, the woman whispered to herself, “She looks like me,” and then went silent for several minutes, the journalist wrote.


In the run-up to London, Long had been training intensively in Colorado Springs—five hours a day in the pool, weights, abs work, yoga and Pilates. Two weeks before the games, however, Long learned that her biological parents had been located in Russia.


An onslaught from the Russian media ensued. They showered her with emails and even passed notes to her through members of the Russian delegation, Long says.


“I’m not going to lie: I was getting a little angry,” she said. “I was like: ‘I am competing. … I can’t deal with this right now.”


Long managed to keep her cool in London, however, snagging two silvers and a bronze to go with her five gold medals at the games.


Within a day after arriving home in Baltimore, Long says, she watched a video of her biological mother, father and sister on a Rossiya-1 talk show that someone had emailed to her. The video helped confirm something she had known intuitively since her childhood.


“I never once felt adopted in my family—never once,” she said. “I just knew that I had another family that looked like me. So, when I first saw the TV show and I first saw my biological mom, it was really cool. Because I just—I look like her.”


Geopolitical Minefield


Jessica Long’s trip to Russia to meet her biological parents and siblings is tentatively set for August. For the friends and family involved, of course, it will be a deeply personal reunion. For many who have followed Long’s story, however, it will also be inseparable from geopolitics.


In December, US President Barack Obama signed the so-called Magnitsky Act, a law that introduces financial and visa sanctions on Russian officials deemed by Washington to be complicit in human rights abuses.


The law, passed as part of a bill normalizing trade relations with Moscow, is named after Sergei Magnitsky, a whistleblowing tax attorney who died in disputed circumstances in a Moscow pretrial detention facility in 2009 after accusing law-enforcement and tax officials of organizing a $230-million tax fraud.


Incensed at what it considers US meddling in its internal affairs, Russia quickly retaliated in part by banning US citizens from adopting Russian children. Officials in Moscow also defend the ban as a measure aimed at protecting Russian children from abuse at the hands of their adoptive American families, citing the deaths of 20 Russian adoptees in the United States during the past two decades.


The adoption ban is named for Dima Yakovlev, also known as Chase Harrison, a Russian toddler who died of heatstroke in 2008 after his US adoptive father left him in an overheated car for several hours.


Long’s name has been invoked on both sides of the adoption debate ever since Russian officials began a vocal push for the ban late last year.


Critics of the ban say it will deny tens of thousands of children—in particular those with disabilities, like Long—the chance of a normal family life. American families have adopted more than 60,000 Russian children over the past two decades, including 962 last year, according to US State Department figures.


Meanwhile, Pavel Astakhov, the Kremlin’s outspoken children’s rights ombudsman, compared Long’s tale of triumph with the horrors faced by Masha Allen, a Russian girl whose adoptive American father molested her and distributed hundreds of pornographic images of her on the Internet.


“I’d rather not play this American roulette; it’s rather humiliating,” Astakhov said in a radio interview in December. “You can grow up to be Jessica Long, or you can grow up to be Masha Allen.”


Long, as one might expect, was disheartened by the adoption ban and hopes that her trip to Russia might help persuade officials and the public that it is misguided.


“It’s given me a loving family,” Long said. “I was raised in a Christian home. I have an education. I was able to swim and excel. Just knowing that some of these kids are going to be stopped from all that is just kind of heartbreaking.”


‘Privyet’ and Pianos


Long attends a weekly Russian language class for US Olympic athletes at the training compound to help them prepare for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. She knows how to say “privyet” (“hello”) and “Kak dela?” (“How are you?”), albeit with a robust American accent. And since childhood she’s known how to say the Russian phrase that aptly encapsulates her relationship to her competition: “Do svidaniya” (“Goodbye”).


It seems unlikely, though, that Long will be able to communicate with her biological family in their native language during the planned August reunion, which Long says may be filmed for posterity by a British studio working on a possible documentary about the swimmer. (Negotiations with the company are in their final stages, Long said, declining to elaborate on the project.)


She says she has rejected repeated attempts by Russian producers to coax her into speaking with her birth parents via Skype for television programs.


“I would really like it to be face-to-face the first time,” Long said.


In the meantime, the swim training continues. The 2016 Paralympic Games will be held in Rio de Janeiro, and Long is set to compete in the US Paralympics Spring Swimming Nationals this weekend in Minneapolis. But she concedes that she’s been taking it easy compared to her regimen last year.


She was in the pool just a handful of times in the five months following the London games. She says she focused more on doing “normal things” like hanging out with friends and family in Baltimore and eating whatever she wanted before returning to Colorado Springs in January to resume training.


“Right now I’m only really swimming mornings and focusing on some school and some Russia stuff,” she said. “But I’m swimming enough to stay in shape.”


Not enough, it seemed during a recent morning workout, to insulate Long from the needling of her coach, Dave Denniston, a former US university swimming champion and Olympic hopeful who lost the use of his legs in a 2005 sledding accident.


As early morning sunlight began to filter in through the aquatic center’s windows, Long turned in an uncharacteristically slow sprint time.


“Somebody get the piano out of the pool,” Denniston quipped from his wheelchair as Long gathered her breath at the wall.


She flashed a mischievous grin when Denniston implored his athletes to “make me smile” on the final sprint of the morning.


When Long tapped the wall five seconds faster than her Steinway time, the coach’s howl of delight ricocheted off the concrete before evaporating into the white noise of gently sloshing water.




© Photo JessicaLong.com




 


 


 


 


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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CROUCHING TIGER on 4/5/2013(UTC)
Dartagnan
#77 Posted : Thursday, April 04, 2013 4:03:22 PM(UTC)
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US Paralympic swimmer Jessica Long was adopted from a Siberian orphanage by a Baltimore couple when she was 13 months old and has gone on to capture gold medals in the last three Paralympic Games, beginning in Athens in 2004 when she was 12 years old. Long, who currently holds 15 Paralympic swimming records, is planning to return to Russian later this year for the first time since her adoption to meet her biological parents. Here, Long takes a water break during practice at the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs


US Paralympic swimmer Jessica Long was adopted from a Siberian orphanage by a Baltimore couple when she was 13 months old and has gone on to capture gold medals in the last three Paralympic Games, beginning in Athens in 2004 when she was 12 years old. Long, who currently holds 15 Paralympic swimming records, is planning to return to Russian later this year for the first time since her adoption to meet her biological parents. Here, Long takes a water break during practice at the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#78 Posted : Monday, April 15, 2013 6:13:08 PM(UTC)
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Russian citizens among injured in Boston Marathon blasts


США Бостон Бостонский марафон взрыв полиция жертвы очевидец


Among the runners at the Boston Marathon there were several Russians. A Boston Marathon list shows 24 Russian nationals.



Explosions near finish line at Boston Marathon: at least 2 killed, more than 100 injured - police 




At least two people are dead following a pair of explosions in Boston, Massachusetts where thousands of runners are participating in the annual Boston Marathon. Local media report at least 100 people have been injured as well.






02:47 MSK: Eight-year-old was one of Boston Marathon attack's deaths - reports


 02:27 MSK: The Voice of Russia correspondent Elena Repina reports: "A bomb, which did not explode in Boston was under a platform which had been set up for the parents of children recently shot dead by a killer in a U.S. school in the state of Connecticut. The last mile of the Boston Marathon was dedicated to the memory of these children."


02:15 MSK:'We still do not know who did this or why' - Obama on Boston Marathon explosions


US President Barack Obama vowed on Monday that the United States will find out who carried out explosions in Boston and will hold them accountable.


"We still do not know who did this or why, and people shouldn't jump to conclusions before we have all the facts," Obama said in a televised statement. "But make no mistake, we will get to the bottom of this, and we will find out who did this, we'll find out why they did this."


Obama said he has directed the federal government to increase security around the United States as necessary after the explosions.








"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#79 Posted : Monday, April 15, 2013 6:37:01 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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Russian Adoptee Tatyana McFadden Wins Boston Marathon Wheelchair Race


Tatyana McFadden of the U.S. crosses the finish line to win the women's wheelchair division of the 117th Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts


WASHINGTON, April 15 (RIA Novosti) – Russian-born Tatyana McFadden won the women’s wheelchair race at the storied Boston Marathon Monday for the second year in a row, firmly establishing herself as one of the best wheelchair distance racers in the world.


“McFadden’s victory marks the first time since 2005 that an American has claimed the olive wreath in back-to-back years,” the organizers of the marathon, now in its 117th year, tweeted.


McFadden, 23, from Clarksville, Maryland, finished the grueling course from the outskirts of Boston into the heart of the historic US city, in 1:45:25, 22 seconds off her personal best. She won $15,000 for finishing first.


McFadden said at first she struggled in the race, “It took me almost half the marathon to catch the lead pack,” she told WBZ in Boston.


McFadden spent the early years of her life in a Russian orphanage after being born in St. Petersburg with an underdeveloped spinal cord and spina bifida, which causes paralysis of the lower body.


She was adopted and brought to the United States at the age of six, and after suffering from anemia and being grossly underweight; she was enrolled in sports programs by her adoptive mother, Debbie McFadden.


She made her international competitive debut at the age of 15 as the youngest member of the US track and field team at the Athens Paralympic Games, where she won a silver medal in the 100 meters and bronze in the 200 meters races.


Four years later at the Beijing Paralympic Games, McFadden won three silver medals, in the 200, 400 and 800 meter races, and bronze in the 4 x 100 meter relay.


In 2009, McFadden won the Chicago marathon women’s wheelchair race. She won the Windy City’s marathon twice more, in 2011 and 2012, and the New York City marathon, in 2010. She now adds two consecutive Boston Marathons to her list of accomplishments.


 


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#80 Posted : Thursday, April 18, 2013 4:24:29 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: It is important to understand that Boston tragedy can happen in any country in the world. Nobody is spared by the bombing. Few days ago this misfortune happened to people in Boston but in the future, it might happen to people of another country. 

Nobody in the world is spared by the bombing. The Boston tragedy is the misfortune of everybody. 

People&governments of all countries have to help each other to avoid this kind of tragedy. 

We have to recognize that people who suffered the most in Boston tragedy or in this kind of tragedy are always the innocent persons. 


Putin: Sochi Junior Ice Hockey Champs to begin with Moment of Silence for Boston Marathon Bombing


27.11.2011 Путин выступление




The World Junior Ice Hockey Championships in Russia’s Sochi should begin with the moment of Silence for Boston marathon bombing, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin said at the opening ceremony Thursday.






The first teams to play are Team Russia and the US that recently experienced a series of tragedies – the Boston marathon blasts and the Texas plant explosion, Putin said.


What makes the Boston crime especially disgusting is that it was carried out during a sports event. I’m sending my condolences on behalf of all people of Russia and my deepest sympathy is with every victim of this tragedy and their families, Russia’s leader said in a speech.


After these words all those present rose and observed a moment of silence to commemorate the victims.


Voice of Russia




"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#81 Posted : Tuesday, April 23, 2013 4:34:51 PM(UTC)
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Maria Sharapova will also be a legend in tennis one day. We will make a movie about her. 


"Legend No. 17" movie breaks box office records


Легенда №17 кино фильм


Legend №17. Russian Trailer (English subtitles)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmqeH36VP9Q


The film “Legend No. 17” about Russia’s ice hockey legend Valery Kharlamov is breaking box office records. Directed by Nikolai Lebedev and starring Danila Kozlovsky as Kharlamov and Oleg Menshikov as famous coach Anatoly Tarasov, the film collected $7.6 million last weekend alone.




At this recording made more than 40 years ago during the USSR-Canada Superseries, you can hear Canadian commentators bursting with emotion and lavishing praise on Valery Kharlamov after he scored the crucial second goal into Canada’s net, bringing the score to 4:2 in Russia’s favor. In that memorable first Superseries game, Russia won a crushing 7:3 victory over Canada. The two goals scored by Kharlamov, No. 17, proved decisive.


The film, the first one about the legendary ice hockey player, reproduces this and other episodes in Kharlamov’s starry sports career with true-to-life accuracy, as many Superseries veterans, who have seen “Legend No. 17”, have affirmed. Kharlamov’s troika partner Vladimir Petrov couldn’t hold back the tears during the premiere.


"It’s so wonderful that our cinematograph has turned to sport and ice hockey, and most importantly, this is a film about our partner Valery Kharlamov. He was indeed an extraordinary personality. His tragic destiny will attract many people."


Kharlamov’s life itself was like a film. As a boy, he, a frail teenager of short stature, dreams of becoming a great hockey player. His talent, drive, dashing speed, the masterly way he handles the stick and his astonishing willpower are not unnoticed. He becomes famous, a living legend, the idol of millions… And suddenly, he dies a tragic death at the age of 33, while still in his prime.


“Legend No. 17” focuses on the relationships between Kharlamov and Anatoly Tarasov, the greatest ice hockey coach of all time.


"The film shows what kind of people Tarasov and Kharlamov really were. It gives true-to-life portrayals of both", Alexander Yakushev, a Superseries vet, said in an interview with the Voice of Russia.


"The actors did a great job. They managed to catch and brilliantly render their features. As in any film, something was invented, something was added. But otherwise, the film is really good. Making films about sports is not easy. This one is an exception when everything worked well. As we, veteran players, sat in the movie hall, watching the film, recalling the episodes we and Valera had lived through and put through our hearts, our eyes filled with tears. We were really deeply touched by the film. We are proud of the fact that such a wonderful film has been made about our mate."


The exact replicas of the ice hockey gear of the 1960s were specially made for the film. Special effects convey the fervor of the “battle of giants” as the Superseries was often dubbed. Some scenes were shot with as many as ten cameras working simultaneously, including slow motion cameras of the Phantom type. It’s not at all surprising that the film strikes a responsive chord, criticLev Karakhan told the Voice of Russia.


"Everyone agrees that this is a professionally made film. The script, the acting, the directing, the montage, the work of the cameramen – everything deserves high praise. This is probably the first Russian film that turns reality into a legend using what has always helped American cinema conquer the movie markets."


 





 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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CROUCHING TIGER on 4/24/2013(UTC)
CROUCHING TIGER
#88 Posted : Wednesday, April 24, 2013 5:55:06 AM(UTC)
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http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2182001/

ABOUT THE MOVIE...


WELCOME TO THE REAL WORLD
Dartagnan
#89 Posted : Tuesday, May 07, 2013 5:48:12 PM(UTC)
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Hockey Worlds: Russia Scores Late to Beat U.S.


Hockey Worlds: Russia Scores Late to Beat U.S.


HELSINKI, May 7 (R-Sport) – Yevgeni Medvedev scored the game-winner with less than seven minutes remaining in the third period as Russia beat the United States 5-3 at the world hockey championship on Tuesday.


With a gaggle of red and white jerseys crowding the American net, Medvedev managed to sneak the puck past a sprawled-out goalie Ben Bishop, sending the largely Russian crowd at Helsinki’s Hartwall Arena into hysterics.


The win moves the Russians, now undefeated in three preliminary round games, into first place in the Helsinki group while the U.S. stays tied for third with Slovakia.


Ilya Bryzgalov, who shut out Latvia in Russia’s tournament opener on Saturday, finished with 19 saves against an American squad that started strong but appeared to tire as they game wore on.


With the game tied 1-1 mid-way through the first period, the Americans did what they’ve done best three games into the world championship: score with a man advantage.


Paul Stastny netted their tournament-leading fifth power-play goal at 13:28 of the first period for a 2-1 lead. It was Stastny’s second goal of the game and fifth point of the tournament.


But less than one minute later Ilya Kovalchuk walked into the American zone and beat Bishop with an easy weak side wrist shot to tie the game.


The veteran winger has seemingly shrugged off concerns about a shoulder injury that hampered him in the final month of the NHL season with the New Jersey Devils, scoring a tournament-best five goals in three games.


Russia had a chance to close out the first period on top after Erik Johnson was nailed for slashing with three minutes left, but they managed only one shot against a tough American penalty kill didn’t allow its first goal until Alexander Radulov scored the game’s final goal late in the third period.


Back in the second, defenseman Matt Hunwick gave the U.S. a 3-2 lead at 7:09 on a blue-line one-timer from Aaron Palushaj that sailed over Bryzgalov and hit the cross bar before bouncing into the net.


Alexei Tereshenko scored the game-tying goal for the Russians at 11:19 of the second.


Bishop, who entered the game having stopped 37 of 41 shots in two games for the U.S., finished with 25 saves.


The game was the first world championship meeting between the two countries since 2009, when Russia downed the U.S. 3-2 in the semifinals. Russia moves to 5-4-1 against the U.S. in world championship play.


The Americans will look to get back in the win column against Finland on Wednesday. Russia, meanwhile, plays France on Thursday.


 


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#90 Posted : Wednesday, May 08, 2013 5:53:33 PM(UTC)
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Siberian Children Get Key Olympic Flame Roles - Official


Have a look to the map


http://en.rian.ru/infogr.../20121012/176574615.html


ATHENS, May 7 (R-Sport) - Children from one of the world’s most remote regions will start the Olympic flame relay for next year’s Winter Games in Sochi, an official from the region has said.


The children from the city of Yakutsk, the capital of Russia’s vast and sparsely populated Siberian region of Yakutia, will start the flame’s 65,000-kilometer journey after it is lit in a ceremony at Olympia.


The high-profile role is an unusual benefit of a town twinning agreement, Yakutsk mayor Aisen Nikolaev said.


“Children from Olympia’s twin towns carry the flame after it is lit in ancient Olympia. Last year, for example, after the flame was lit for the London Olympics, children from a twin town in Japan carried the flame,” he said while visiting Greece as part of a trade delegation.


“Now there’s already an agreement that the flame for the Sochi Olympics will be carried by children from Yakutsk.”


The torch relay for Sochi 2014 will start October 7 and is set to be the longest in history. The Games will run from February 7 to 23 next year.


The region of Yakutia is home to fewer than a million people despite covering more than three million square kilometers, enough to make it the largest sub-national region in the world. Yakutsk has a population of around 270,000 and is a center for the diamond trade.


Since 1996, Yakutia has hosted the Children of Asia games, a continent-wide competition with a program of 17 sports.


 


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#91 Posted : Monday, May 13, 2013 5:18:45 PM(UTC)
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Yesterday, 23:43 



Ice Hockey Worlds: Russia beats Austria 8:4



Ice Hockey Worlds: Russia beats Austria 8:4


Russia’s team at the world hockey championship trounced Austria 8-4 in Helsinki on Monday. The loss means Austria finishes last in the Helsinki pool with one day left in the preliminary round.




Russia blew a 2-0 first-period lead but rallied to thump Austria 8-4 in their round-robin finale. The defending champions will be seeded no lower than third for the quarter-finals. Austria is relegated to Division I for 2014.


Ilya Kovalchuk paced the attack with a goal and two assists, while Alexander Radulov, Ilya Nikulin, and Sergei Mozyakin had a goal and an assist apiece. Alexander Perezhogin, Sergei Soin, Nikita Zaitsev, and Yevgeni Kuznetsov also scored for Russia, while Alexander Popov and Kirill Petrov each had two helpers.


 Thomas Vanek and Michael Raffl replied with a goal and an assist apiece for Austria, and Matthias Iberer and Florian Iberer had the other goals.


It is the fifth time in a row that Austria has been demoted from the elite division. It also happened in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011.


Russia, meanwhile, now has 15 points and finishes the preliminary round tied for first place with the United States, who plays their final first-round game against Slovakia on Tuesday.


The first round wraps up Tuesday with six games, many of which will decide who takes the fourth and final playoff spot out of the Helsinki and Stockholm groups.


IIHF



"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#92 Posted : Saturday, May 18, 2013 3:43:56 PM(UTC)
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Pole Vault: Isinbayeva Wins Comeback Meet in Shanghai


Yelena Isinbayeva


MOSCOW, May 18 (R-Sport) - Russian pole vault queen Yelena Isinbayeva won her first competition of the season on Saturday by jumping 4.70 meters at the Diamond League meeting in Shanghai.


The 30-year-old skipped the winter season after a tough Olympic year in which she won bronze, and is using the event in China to prepare for the Moscow world athletics championships in August.


The Russian posted the winning height - well below her world record of 5.06 meters - at the second attempt after skipping the opening eight heights.


Up-and-coming American vaulter Mary Saxer took the silver with a personal best of 4.60 after wobbling at 4.50.


Germany's Silke Spiegelburg, the 2011 European indoor silver medalist, won bronze with a vault of 4.55 meters.


Isinbayeva, setter of 28 world records, won gold at the Athens and Beijing Olympics but failed to defend her title in London, finishing third behind Jennifer Suhr of the United States and Cuba’s Yarisley Silva.


She remains unbeaten in five appearances in Shanghai; this being her first since 2008.


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#93 Posted : Saturday, June 01, 2013 8:38:24 PM(UTC)
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Russian daredevil jumps from Everest


Эверест Непал Гималаи горы гора твердь вершина пик скала




Russian alpinist Valery Rozov has done what no one had done before – he has jumped from the world’s highest mountain, Everest. Everest is 8,848 meters high, but Valery jumped from the height of 7,220 meters.






VIDEO:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aTOS6IcWqw


 


 




 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Dartagnan
#94 Posted : Saturday, June 01, 2013 8:50:09 PM(UTC)
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Russian gymnasts win team event at European Championships, Vienna


художественная гимнастика




Russian gymnasts have won the team event at the European Championships in Vienna.






 Last Saturday witnessed the final team events at the competition, and Russians Yana Kudryavtseva and Margarita Mamun triumphed in both disciplines - the clubs and the ribbon, securing first and second place.


As a result, the Russian team earned a total score of 147.114, placing them far ahead of the Ukrainian and Belarusian teams, who secured second and third places, respectively.






 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Dartagnan
#95 Posted : Monday, June 03, 2013 8:00:27 PM(UTC)
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World Student Games’ flame arrives in Moscow





The Student Games’ flame has arrived in the Russian capital for the Moscow leg of 2013 Universiade’s torch relay that is to run off in Kazan on 6-17 July.
 


The Moscow stretch started at the front stairs of the Lomonosov State University, one of Russia’s oldest universities, from whence it will be brought to the Olympic complex Luzhniki.






The Moscow leg spans 8.8km and will see as many as 40 torch-bearers, including Olympic champions, showbiz stars and best students, carry it through the streets of downtown Moscow.


The first in the line is Nikolai Gulyaev, a famous Soviet and Russian speed skater, 1988 Olympic and 1987 European champion and twice champion of Russia.


Bringing up the rear will be Sergei Klyugin, a renowned Russian high jumper, coach of Russia’s athletic team and 2000 Summer Olympic champion.


The last year’s Universiade flame was lit at Sorbonne University in Paris, the venue of the first international students' games.




 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Dartagnan
#96 Posted : Friday, June 14, 2013 6:11:38 PM(UTC)
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Boxer Povetkin Mimics Rocky With Klitschko Fight Training


Alexander Povetkin


MOSCOW, June 14 (R-Sport) - In a scenario reminiscent of the film “Rocky IV”, Russian heavyweight contender Alexander Povetkin will train in the wilds of Kyrgyzstan for his upcoming bout with four-belt world champion Wladimir Klitschko.


In the film, title character Rocky Balboa isolates himself in a rural part of the Soviet Union, chopping down trees and hauling sleds as he eschews the high-tech training regime of his Russian opponent Ivan Drago.


Povetkin’s choice of training camp is just as remote, on the shores of the mountain-ringed Issyk-Kul lake in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan, sandwiched between Russia and China. And, just as in “Rocky IV”, he’ will be training for a heavyweight clash in Moscow.


The Russian’s trainer Alexander Zimin told R-Sport on Friday the camp would be at “mid-mountain conditions” and would last for most of next month.


“At that time, as experience shows, there are good climatic conditions for training, and the weather isn’t too hot, 24 or 26 degrees (78-82 Fahrenheit),” he said.


“Basic work will be carried out that will allow us to build a good basis for further preparation,” he added. “Fifty percent of the training will be given over to general physical preparation, and the other 50 for specialized preparation.”


Povetkin will be joined at his Kyrgyz retreat by cruiserweight Denis Lebedev, who is seeking a rematch with Guillermo Jones, after the Panamanian defeated him for the WBA belt last month.


The bout with Klitschko will be the biggest fight so far for the unbeaten Povetkin, known as the "Russian Vityaz," who holds the WBA regular champion title. Povetkin has 25 career wins, 19 of them by knockout as was Olympic superheavyweight champion in 2004.


Ukraine’s Klitschko, who has the monicker of "Dr. Steelhammer," has won 60 professional bouts and lost three. His undefeated streak stretches back 18 fights to a technical loss to Lamon Brewster in 2004.


The Klitschko-Povetkin bout will take place October 5 in Moscow, with organizers eyeing the Olimpiisky arena as the most likely venue.


 


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Alireza on 6/15/2013(UTC)
Dartagnan
#97 Posted : Saturday, June 15, 2013 5:31:33 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: I don't think it is a suicide. It might be a murder because a person who is successfull in her favorite sport can't kill herself...I mean it is strange to die in these conditions after so many successes in sport 


Russian Judo Star Committed Suicide - Investigators



MOSCOW, June 15 (RIA Novosti) – Russian judo star Yelena Ivashchenko, 28, is likely to have committed suicide by throwing herself from the 15th floor of an apartment block, the Investigative Committee said Saturday.


The body of the four times winner of the European Judo Championships was discovered on the ground near a residential building in the Siberian city of Tyumen, the Investigative Committee said in a statement on its website. Her passport and a suicide note were also found, according to the statement.   


Earlier the Russian Judo Federation described the death of Ivashchenko as a "tragedy."


“Everybody who spoke to Lena was infected by her energy and began to develop a liking for this very positive girl,” the Federation said on their website. “We offer our deepest condolences to friends and family.”


Born in the Siberian city of Omsk, near Russia’s border with Kazakhstan, Ivashchenko won a gold medal at the European Judo Championships in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012. She won silver at the World Judo Championships in 2008, and bronze in 2007 and 2011. Last summer she represented Russia at the Olympics in London.

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Dartagnan
#99 Posted : Sunday, June 16, 2013 7:41:49 PM(UTC)
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Rugby: Russian Women's Sevens Take Grand Prix Cup in Spain



MOSCOW, June 16 (R-Sport) – Russia pulled off a commanding 29-12 Cup win over France at the women’s rugby sevens Grand Prix Series in Marbella, Spain, on Sunday.


The Russians went undefeated in seven matches at the two-day tournament, which is widely seen as a brush-up for the World Cup in Moscow later this month.


Russia beat Wales, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands and Ukraine in Pool B play before knocking off Ireland in the semifinals earlier Sunday. Pavel Baranovsky’s team scored 215 tries and allowed only 41 over the course of the tournament.


The women’s sevens team was ranked second in Grand Prix Series with 18 points heading into the tournament. They sat two behind England, who won the Plate over Italy on Sunday.


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Alireza on 6/17/2013(UTC)
Dartagnan
#98 Posted : Monday, June 17, 2013 6:54:04 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: The coach gives us another point of view about the suicide of a champion.


Anyway this suicide is very strange...Do you think that a person can kill herself because she lost a gold medal at the olympic games ? If it were the case plenty of sport persons would have killed themselves. 


This answer is not clear...


Olympic Failure Prompted Russian Judoka's Suicide - Coach


TYUMEN, Russia, June 17 (R-Sport) - Failure at the London 2012 Olympics was a contributing factor in the apparent suicide of Russian judoka Elena Ivashchenko, a judo official who knew her said Monday.


Ivashchenko, a four-time European champion who lost in the quarterfinals of the +78kg category at the 2012 Games, died Saturday morning after jumping from a 15th-floor apartment in the Siberian city of Tyumen. She was 28.


Russian media reports have said Ivashchenko had been in a state of severe depression, and the director of the "Tyumen Judo" Olympic preparation center Vyacheslav Yurlov claimed it was set off by the Olympic flop.


"Elena Ivashchenko was a beautiful, kind and sociable person; a strong athlete on the mat but a fragile girl off it," Yurlov said.


"Her depression started after her defeat at the Olympic Games. She really punished herself for it. Those athletes she lost to, she had beaten them before several times."


Yurlov was referring to Idalys Ortiz, the Cuban judoka who dumped Ivashchenko out of the competition and went on to win the gold medal.


Ivashchenko also needed several operations on a leg injury, Yurlov said, with the next surgery scheduled for July.


"She never complained, she put up with it all, kept it bottled up inside," he said. "It seems that she couldn't cope with the emotional weight of it all, and opted for suicide."


Ivashchenko's sudden death has reverberated around the international judo community, with the European Judo Union calling her “one of the strong pillars of the Russian women’s team and in her category.”


“Her performances and her personality will be forever in our minds," the union said in a statement issued Sunday.


Ivashchenko finished seventh in London. She won gold at the European Judo Championships in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012. She took silver at the 2008 worlds and bronze in 2007 and 2011.


 


Dartagnan;324461 wrote:


Dartagnan: I don't think it is a suicide. It might be a murder because a person who is successfull in her favorite sport can't kill herself...I mean it is strange to die in these conditions after so many successes in sport 


Russian Judo Star Committed Suicide - Investigators



MOSCOW, June 15 (RIA Novosti) – Russian judo star Yelena Ivashchenko, 28, is likely to have committed suicide by throwing herself from the 15th floor of an apartment block, the Investigative Committee said Saturday.


The body of the four times winner of the European Judo Championships was discovered on the ground near a residential building in the Siberian city of Tyumen, the Investigative Committee said in a statement on its website. Her passport and a suicide note were also found, according to the statement.   


Earlier the Russian Judo Federation described the death of Ivashchenko as a "tragedy."


“Everybody who spoke to Lena was infected by her energy and began to develop a liking for this very positive girl,” the Federation said on their website. “We offer our deepest condolences to friends and family.”


Born in the Siberian city of Omsk, near Russia’s border with Kazakhstan, Ivashchenko won a gold medal at the European Judo Championships in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012. She won silver at the World Judo Championships in 2008, and bronze in 2007 and 2011. Last summer she represented Russia at the Olympics in London.


"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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Alireza on 6/17/2013(UTC)
Alireza
#100 Posted : Tuesday, June 18, 2013 11:56:03 AM(UTC)
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Iran qualifed to World Cup 2014 by a sweet victory over Korea! 


Korea coach said that he wouldn't allow Iran to qualify and would beat Iran 4-0! LOL :D :D What a stupid dream! :D :D

Persian Gulf FOREVER -Arabs can not change the history, they can't cheat-
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