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CULTURE&HISTORY - NEWS
Dartagnan
#48 Posted : Tuesday, January 08, 2013 3:40:20 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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Schwarzenegger coming back


губернатор Калифорнии, актер Арнольд Шварценеггер



Arnold Schwarzenegger will live up to his famous “I will be back” promise, when he arrives in Moscow on January 23 as part of his world tour to promote his new film, “The Last Stand”, directed by Kim Ji-woon of South Korea, Schwarzenegger’s first reappearance on screen after a seven-year break.




The actor paid a working visit to Russia in October 2010 in his capacity as California’s governor.


Addressing reporters at the end of the visit, he said that he had promised the Russian president to return and would keep his world.


 



 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#41 Posted : Tuesday, January 08, 2013 4:21:27 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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'No one compares to Putin'


In a post in "Foreign Policy" magazine, the Eurasia Group named Russian President Vladimir Putin No. 2 for most powerful people in the world while leaving the No. 1 stop virtually empty while global leaders wait for someone to take on "the world's toughest and most dangerous challenges." Interview with Ian Bremmer, President of the Eurasia Group.


About 150 analysts of the political science consultancy Eurasia Group were asked to rank the world’s leaders based on the following definition of power: "a measure of an individual’s ability to single-handedly bring about change that significantly affects the lives and fortunes of large amounts of people."


The group then took the aggregate average of the surveys and produced a list that left the No. 1 spot empty followed by Putin. Then U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Barack Obama rounded out the top five.


Andrew Hiller discussed the rankings with Ian Bremmer, President of the Eurasia Group.


So, when Foreign Policy magazine came to you and asked you to come up with the rankings of the most powerful and influential in the world. How did you go about coming up with your list?


Well, we’re the world’s largest political risk consultancy. I put together a little note to all of our analysts sent to our offices, some about 150 folks, gave them a quick definition of power and said, you know, sort of come up with your rankings, who you believe the top ten most powerful folks are. And then we’ll collate them and have a list, you know. There were a few folks and a couple of ties, a couple of people that could have almost made to the list, but didn’t quite generally speaking what you see is what you get.


So, your rankings are actually an aggregate average based on your office and operationally speaking what is your definition of power?


There are many, but I think there is a pretty standard one in political science: the power is a measure of an individual’s ability to singlehandedly bring about change that significantly affects the lives and fortunes of large numbers of people.


So, your definition doesn’t necessarily distinguish between the power within a country or the power of influencing externally?


It’s both together.


Was it a surprise to you that Putin ranked number two?


No, not at all. I mean, you think about it, the checks and balances on Putin as an individual in Russia are de minimis compared to any country remotely Russia’s size. I mean, there clearly are tiny dictatorships out there where individuals truly have absolute power, you think about a sort of place like Turkmenistan, for example, may be even North Korea though it’s hard to say with Kim Jong Un, certainly it was the case with Kim Jong Il. Russia is a real country, Russia is a country in size, a real economy, it’s an energy superpower. They’ve got a real military and yet you know it’s controlled to an enormous degree by one guy? There’s lots of downside there –what happens if he dies and there is a lot of downside in terms of you know, sort of what about rule of law, what about governance? But if you want to talk about power, you want to really look around the world to see who is the most powerful person -one person out there. It’s really obvious, it’s Putin.


So your study really had no sort of qualitative look at power for good, or for evil or for neutral. It really was just looking at just raw power and who’s got the most ability to affect change?


You know, if you’ve seen the Time Person of the Year, I don’t exactly like their methodology but historically they’ve had a lot of folks that have not exactly been sort of paragons of humanity. When you talk about people who are powerful, in the US a lot would look at banking CEOs being very powerful, but there’re not a lot of folks in America who are thinking they’re sort of the models of virtue and beneficence in the US right now. This point is made much more sharply with Putin but again I’m a political scientist, we’re in a political science company. If you are asking, who is the greatest humanitarian in the world - Bill Gates might have been up there or Dalai Lama – you won’t be getting Putin. I think, it’s pretty clear. But if you are talking about power, give the man his due, I mean he doesn’t just do judo –he actually jiu jitsus the whole country.


Right below Putin, and I have to admit, this surprised me, ahead of the President of the US, was Ben Bernanke, who is the Chairman of the Fed, why? Is he more powerful than Obama?


This is an interesting point. Merkel is also listed as more powerful than Obama, and again you look at Time’s Person of the Year, I personally would have thought Merkel would have given the year, she’s had an importance on Europe. If you are giving it to one person, you would give it to Merkel before Obama.


Obama is not the President of the world’s only superpower, he is. It’s that Washington’s politics have become so divisive, they’ve become so volatile, that the ability of Obama to project and use that power is much more constrained than, I think, a lot of presidents have been historically.


Who does have truly a lot more capacity to affect that internationally, but the US has never desired to be the world’s policeman today. We’re actually reducing. We’ve left Iraq, we are reducing our footprint in Afghanistan and much more power has been projected with cash these days than it has been projected just with missiles, or drones or aircraft carriers.


On that front, it’s the question of policy-making and the ability to actually move the needle, that’s where Eurasia Group came out and said that actually you put Bernanke and Merkel before Obama.


Maybe that could change over the next two years. 2013 having just won the presidency, Obama should have a lot of political capital but having the last few weeks in Washington with the fiscal cliff certainly don’t move you in that direction.


Is it also a statement that Bernanke doesn’t seem to have the checks and balances that other agencies amongst the government does and seems to be fairly autonomous in his ability to move?


That’s right and someone like Draghi would be ECB because that situation has become so politicized given the crisis the eurozone is under. The ECB has expanded its power but still much more working with and in concert with major European leaders where Bernanke’s ability to act pretty independently, pretty autonomously with the relatively small group of technocrats who are pretty deep politicized. I mean a lot of people would say that Bernanke’s QE infinity did a great deal to help Obama actually win reelection. Bernanke is a Democrat, but he had a lot of influence as an independent technocratic actor in the US government, so I think that the ranking of number three actually shows that. But Bernanke is no Putin, let’s be clear.


And I want to go back to Merkel also for a second, because I remember talking at the beginning of the year, before there was a fiscal cliff there was an austerity cliff with Greece, with Italy,with France and the fear that all these countries were about to domino over. Merkel more or less was able to sort of strong-arm these countries and the Central Bank into coming up with a plan that she thought would make the world work. Is her ranking fair in your view?


She did not only that but she also did it with power ratings of nearly 70%. In fact, there was a poll recently asking Germans if they would support an additional bailout for the Greeks, 47% percent of Germans reported yes, 42% said no. The Greeks – this is Merkel’s doing, she’s done a fantastic job, she’s been able not just to ensure the continued sanctity of the eurozone, she’s taken Greek set off the table, she’s been able to move towards a common European banking union, make preliminary steps towards a fiscal union but she’s also done it with the support of her own population. Incumbencies are doing badly in the post-financial crisis world. Merkel is a serious exception to that.


And power for power sake is relatively meaningless. What do you think this power can be exercised for, what will this enable Putin, Bernanke or Merkel to do?


There’s the reason why the number one is nobody. And it’s very clear that the US is the world’s only superpower but if you do not actually use that power, especially on the global stage. I mean let’s face it-the Europeans just gone through the worst financial crisis we’ve seen since the Depression. There was a lot of ask for help, there was no one, I mean, Obama or Romney it didn’t matter-no one was going to support the Marshall Plan or anything remotely like that for Europeans.


When Sarkozy went to China and met with Hu Jintao, Hu Jintao said that’s nice that you’re here but we are not going to write any checks. You know, we’re in my view, what we call a G0 world, not a G7 or G20, but a G0 – place that has an absence of global leadership and putting nobody as number one I think really does reflect the fact that there is a vacuum of power. It’s also nice to say that there is nobody more powerful than Vladimir Putin.


You do have to wonder we’re coming towards the period where there are economic issues they’re certainly worldwide, there’re environmental issues, there’re energy need issues which are going to need a worldwide solution given the ingrowing industrialization and the growing population that’s going around the world. Is there a player out there who can create unity or make sure that what needs to happen at least is pushed along a useful track?


There isn’t at the global level. I mean before the financial crisis the US was really leading all of these world institutions, you certainly saw that on trade, you think about the IMF, you think about the World Bank, the UN. I mean these are all institutions created by the US with their allies, their priorities, their capital. The US is no longer leading global institutions, but this doesn’t mean there’s no leading going on. It’s just that leading hasn’t been done globally. And you will see in 2013 the US working hard to push through, for example a very big trade deal the Transpacific Partnership. If it happens, it will involve forty percent of the world’s GDP, that’s not 100 or 80 percent - that’s 40. But it’s effectively the Coalition of the Willing on the economic side.


That’s not an ideal outcome but in a G0 world we will see many of these global challenges, we increasingly will need to ensure that the “Great” is not the enemy of the “Good”. We’re going to be accepting, you know, sort of good enough in many cases because the Great,the optimal is not coming.

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#42 Posted : Wednesday, January 09, 2013 9:50:22 AM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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Sochi 2014 puts creativity at the Heart of its Cultural Olympiad


открытие Russia.Sochi.Park Лондон Сочи парк



The Sochi 2014 Cultural Olympiad has announced the launch of a public contest for creative groups willing to participate in the Cultural Program of the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi.




This unique contest encourages the participation of talented teams from across the world, with the artists performing a wide variety of genres - from modern stage singing and dancing to pantomime and acrobatics.


The winners and finalists of the competition will get the opportunity to demonstrate their skills on a global stage and become a high-profile part of the Sochi 2014 Cultural Olympiad, as they will perform in Sochi in front of the numerous guests of the 2014 Olympic and Paralympic Games.


The selection process will consist of two stages. Firstly, the finalists will be chosen through an online voting system, and then an expert panel, consisting of well-known cultural figures, will announce the three winners who could be solo artists or groups.


Entries from Russia and all of the participating countries in the 2014 Games in Sochi are invited and all musical genres are welcome to apply, including: pop songs (romance, ballad, folk songs), jazz, stage dancing (folk, ballroom, ballet, modern), stage theater, spoken genre (a scene, sketch, story, monologue), pantomime, parody, acrobatics, gymnastics, balancing acts, clown show, juggling, athletics, magic tricks, costumes and others.


To participate in the contest simply upload a video clip of your performance by August 28, 2013 on a fully accessible video-hosting website and send the link and information about yourself to:contest@sochi2014.com. You can also send the video, along with a completed registration form, to: P.O. Box 154, Moscow 105005.


Beginning October 29, 2012, the audition tapes will be available online for you to vote for your favorite act at www.culture.sochi2014.com. Applications will be accepted until August 28, 2013. Finalists will be announced on September 10, 2013.


All details on the staging of the contest and the registration form will be accessible on the website www.culture.sochi2014.com



 


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#43 Posted : Wednesday, January 09, 2013 9:55:52 AM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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Depardieu offered a job in Siberia


Jan 9, 2013 14:50 Moscow Time


Актер Жерар Депардье черногория депардье



A drama theatre in Russia’s town of Tyumen (Siberia) has offered French actor Gerard Depardieu a job.




The actor is welcome to join the company with a monthly salary of $755.


The theatre's manager said that Mr. Depardieu should expected an official invitation later this month.


It will be an opportunity for Depardieu to learn Russian language. 


“I am very grateful to Russia’s authorities for making me a Russian citizen,” Mr. Depardieu said in an interview to the main Russian TV channel. “I really love Russia. I love Russian people, Russian history, Russian literature. I love to play in Russian films. I love the Russian style of thinking. My father was a Communist and often listened to Radio Moscow, and my childhood memories are linked with that. I promise to learn Russian.”




"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#44 Posted : Wednesday, January 09, 2013 10:07:47 AM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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Swedish artist could face 8-year prison sentence for drawing with Holocaust victims’ ashes


холокост евреи народ истребление



Prosecutors in Poland have started an investigation into a Swedish artist’s claim that he used ashes of Holocaust victims to make a painting. The artist could face up to eight years in prison if he is charged with desecrating human ashes.




The artist, Carl Michael von Hausswolff, claims that the painting was drawn with ashes that he took from crematorium furnaces in Majdanek, a former Nazi German death camp located in eastern Poland, on a visit there in 1989.


The small painting named “Memory Works” made of broad vertical brown and gray strokes of brush that leave an impression of a tight group of people, was displayed in the Bryder Gallery in Lund, Sweden, last year.


The prosecutors opened an investigation to check whether there is truth in the artist’s claim as there were no security cameras on the site at that time. Moreover, on the painting the ashes were mixed with water, which makes it difficult to determine whether von Hausswolff used victims’ ashes in the painting or is simply staging a publicity stunt.


If evidence is found, the artist can be charged with desecrating human ashes, and could face up to eight years in prison.


It is estimated the Nazis murdered 80,000 people at Majdanek, three-quarters of them Jews, during the German occupation of Poland in World War II. In 1989, there were still some human ashes remaining in furnaces from the war from the burning of the Nazi’s victims.


BBC, the National Post



 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#45 Posted : Thursday, January 31, 2013 6:35:53 PM(UTC)
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Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin  (1799 –1837) was a Russian author of the Romantic era who is considered by many to be the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature.


Pushkin was born into the Russian nobility in Moscow. A remarkable fact about his ancestry is that one great-grandfather of his -Abram Gannibal - was brought over as a slave from Africa and had risen to become an artistocrat. Pushkin published his first poem at the age of fifteen, and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum.


While under the strict surveillance of the Tsar's political police and unable to publish, Pushkin wrote his most famous play, the drama Boris Godunov. His novel in verseEugene Onegin, was serialized between 1825 and 1832.


Notoriously touchy about his honour, Pushkin fought a total of twenty-nine duels, and was fatally wounded in such an encounter with Georges-Charles de Heeckeren d'Anthès. D'Anthès, a French officer serving with the Chevalier Guard Regiment, had been attempting to seduce the poet's wife, Natalya Pushkina. Pushkin's early death at the age of 37 is still regarded as a catastrophe for Russian literature.


Dartagnan: Many historians&poets think that the last Pushkin's duel has been organized by his enemies. Alexander Pushkin used to write many peoms against the Tsar of Russia. 


The great poet of Russia Lermentov wrote a beautifull poem about the meaning of Pushkin's death. 


Pushkin's death remembers me the more recent death of the poet Sergei Esenin in 1925. 


The poet Sergei Esenin wrote in one of his poem: " (After the 1917 october revolution) Came the same crooks, the same thieves. And with the october revolution they captured everybody ... "


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8P4oGFWKSbY


Death of the Poet - written by Lermentov


The Poet's dead! - a slave to honor -
He fell, by rumor slandered,
Lead in his breast and thirsting for revenge,
Hanging his proud head!...
The Poet's soul could not endure
Petty insult's disgrace.
Against society he rose,
Alone, as always...and was slain!
Slain!...What use is weeping now,
The futile chorus of empty praise
Excuses mumbled full of pathos?
Fate has pronounced its sentence!
Was it not you who spitefully
Rebuffed his free, courageous gift
And for your own amusement fanned
The nearly dying flame?
Well now, enjoy yourselves...he couldn't
Endure the final torture:
Quenched is the marvelous light of genius,
Withered is the triumphal wreath.

Cold-bloodedly his murderer
Took aim...there was no chance of flight:
His empty heart beat evenly,
The pistol steady in his hand.
No wonder...from far away
The will of fate sent him to us
Like hundreds of his fellow vagrants
In search of luck and rank;
With impudence he mocked and scorned
The tongue and mores of this strange land;
He could not spare our glory,
Nor in that bloody moment know
"gainst what he'd raised his hand!...

He's slain - and taken by the grave
Like that unknown, but happy bard,
Victim of jealousy wild,
Of whom he sang with wondrous power,
Struck down, like him, by an unyielding hand.

Why did he quit the blissful peace of simple fellowship
To enter this society, so envious and stifling
To hearts of free and fiery passion?
Why did he give his hand to worthless slanderers,
How could he have believed their hollow words
And kindness, he, who'd ever understood his fellow man?...

And they removed his wreath, and set upon his head
A crown of thorns entwined in laurel:
The hidden spines were cruel
And pierced his noble brow;
Poisoned were his final moments
By sly insinuations of mockers ignorant,
And thus he died - for vengeance vainly thirsting
Secretly vexed by false hopes deceived.
The wondrous singing's ceased,
T'will never sound again.
His refuge, gloomy and small,
His lips forever sealed.

_____
And you, the offspring arrogant
Of fathers known for malice,
Crushing with slavish heels the ruins
Of clans aggrieved by fortune's game!
You, greedy hordes around the throne,
Killers of Freedom, Genius and Glory!
You hide beneath the canopy of law
Fall silent - truth and justice before you...
But justice also comes from God, corruption's friends!
The judge most terrible awaits you:
He's hardened to the clink of gold,
He knows your future thoughts and deeds.
Then will you turn in vain to lies:
They will no longer help.
And your black blood won't wash away
The poet's sacred blood!

1837
"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#46 Posted : Saturday, February 02, 2013 3:28:21 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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The greatest battle of all time – and why it still matters today for Americans and Russians.


              



Saturday, February 2 marks a very obscure date for Americans, but one that saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of young American boys in World War II: It is the 70th anniversary of the final surrender of German forces at Stalingrad – The decisive battle of World War II.




Some 400,000 German soldiers died in the more than five month battle for the city named after one of the worst tyrants in history on the steep western banks of the Volga River. Another 265,000 Hungarians, Romanians and Italians in the armies of Germany’s allies were killed or captured. The battle annihilated Adolf Hitler’s Sixth Army, the most formidable infantry assault force the world had ever seen. Afterwards, the Germans only managed only one more major tactical victory, around Kharkov, in the whole war. Russian casualties at Stalingrad exceeded one million.
Today, all those generations later, the extraordinary struggle for Stalingrad still defines 21st century Russia. Standing atop Mamayev Kurgan, the focal point of the battle of Stalingrad, as I did some years ago, it is easy to see why.


The colossal scale of the fighting between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union in what Russians call the Great Patriotic War was well recognized by Americans and Britons at the time but it has been virtually forgotten since. But it dwarfed every other battlefront of the war combined. Eight out of 10 German soldiers killed in World War II died fighting the Red Army. The colossal total of nearly 27 million Soviet military and civilian dead was more than twice the death toll of all Americans, Britons, Commonwealth, French and even Germans killed in the war combined.


And the focal point of all of it was this surprisingly tranquil and atmospheric strip city that unfolds for 30 miles along the great River Volga. Named at the time after Soviet Premier Josef Stalin, it was the dramatic apparent last stand of the Soviet Red Army against an apparently invincible Wehrmacht that had conquered the entire European continent in less than three years. But at Stalingrad all that changed.


"Beyond the Volga there is nothing!" went the Soviet rallying cry -- and there wasn't. Even now looking east from the imposing heights of Mamayev Kurgan, it is eerie to see that on the other side of the great Volga, a river as broad and impressive as the Mississippi, the embodiment of the soul of Russia, there literally is -- nothing. Just low sand dunes that gave the city it’s originally name of Tsaritsyn, or "Golden Sand" back in 1589. And they stretch off for thousands of miles across the lower Eurasian steppe.


Mamayev Kurgan is a war memorial like no other on earth -- for it is dominated by an angry goddess. The most gigantic, impressive and eerie statue in the world, Rodina-Mat, the Mother Goddess of Russia, touts up 160 feet without any pedestal, 20 feet higher than the Statue of Liberty. She weighs 1,000 tons, more than 15 times the Statue of Liberty. But all that is the least of it.


Lady Liberty is at ease and serene, but Rodina-Mat is dynamic and furious. Her beautiful, surprisingly girlish face conveys nightmarish shock, fury and rage. Her arm is not relaxed and passively extended, carrying a torch like Lady Liberty. It is upraised carrying a 70-foot long sword that soars so high in the sky it has to have a red navigation light on its tip to alert low-flying aircraft.


Seen from afar, the sight is even more impressive, even terrifying. For Rodina-Mat is on the commanding height of the ridge skyline above the city at its most fought over point. You can see her from anywhere you drive along the main arterial north-south roads along the Volga. She always appears in movement, alive, striking down the invaders with her amazing sword. It is as if Athene or Aphrodite had stepped out of the pages of Homer's Iliad and across time from the battlefields of Troy or as if a gigantic astronaut-god visualized by Erich von Daniken again strode across the earth.


During the 200 days of Stalingrad, Mamayev Kurgan was fought over for 130 of them. Today, it is the resting place for 35,000 Soviet soldiers.


According to British military historian Anthony Bevoir, 1.1 million Soviet soldiers died in the Battle of Stalingrad and that does not include the at least 100,000 and possibly three times as many civilian inhabitants of the city massacred by the repeated waves of indiscriminate Luftwaffe air attacks. More than twice as many Russian civilians perished in the first week of air raids as died in the Allied bombing of Dresden. When Soviet interrogators asked Field Marshal Friedrich Paulus, the captured commander of the Sixth Army, why he had authorized such needless slaughter, he really did reply that he was only following orders.


Nazi losses were colossal, too. According to Russian estimates, 1.5 million German and Axis soldiers lost their lives in the entire campaign, more than five times the entire U.S. combat dead for all of the war and more than twice the combined Union and Confederate dead of the entire U.S. Civil War. None of the Axis remains that were found and identified were buried within the city. It is sacred soil to the Russian people. Only the heroic defenders of Stalingrad and the Motherland, or Rodina, are allowed the ultimate honor of resting there.


The entire German Sixth Army -- some 300,000 men -- at the time the most renowned and invincible infantry on earth, perished at Stalingrad. Just 90,000 of them survived to be taken prisoner with their commander, Field Marshal Paulus. Of them, only 9,000 survived their long captivity to ever be repatriated home to Germany.


Paulus' headquarters in the basement of Univermag, the Central Department Store of the city, is now a museum, too, one of the strangest on earth and a striking contrast to the primeval, heroic, epic grandeur of the statuary and memorials at Mamayev Kurgan.


Univermag is a department store again now -- very reminiscent of the kind you would see in Sioux City, Iowa, or Iowa City that was built in the 1920s and that flourished until Wal-Mart swallowed them all up. Just go through the main entrance, walk past children's toys, turn left, navigate past lady's pajamas and glassware, and without any warning you are there.


The basement has been filled with reconstructions of Sixth Army's last stand. Behind one door, models of two dying German soldiers lie in what really was an emergency operating room. Behind another, an animatronic Paulus endlessly rises from behind his office desk to hear the latest news of catastrophe from another officer. Everywhere, the whine of the unforgiving winter steppe wind and merciless whroosh of the Soviet Katyusha or "Little Katie" rocket mortars sound their accompaniment.


Ilya Ehrenburg, greatest of all Soviet war correspondents, wrote that the soldiers in their basement and rubble strongholds clinging on to the banks of the Volga by mere feet and yards, loved those rocket mortars and it is still true today. Some years ago, the faces of 80-year-old highly decorated veterans of the battle light up with boyish enthusiasm and joy when I asked them what their favorite weapon of the entire war was. "Katyusha!" they cried, jumping up and down, the years falling away from them by magic. "Katyusha!"


Some 70 years after Paulus surrendered, and more than 67 years since the Third Reich was finally crushed, the memories and scars of that struggle still define modern Russia. Communism is dead but Russian patriotism is not. And that is why in an era of growing differences and alienation between Russia and the United States, we need to remember the passionate intensity of that struggle, how much it contributed to our victory too and what it cost the Russian people.


Russia remains a great, proud and militarily mighty nation that cannot be ignored. Global peace and security in the 21st century are impossible if we cannot cooperate with it. The Russian people cannot be ignored or underestimated: The wild, ferocious but utterly authentic emotions that play across the extraordinary face of the Rodina-Mat testify to the dangerous costs of forgetting that.


Martin Sieff is a Senior Fellow of the American University in Moscow 


This article was published in Baltimore Post-Examiner newspaper



 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#47 Posted : Tuesday, March 05, 2013 6:15:54 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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THE PAST & THE PRESENT. It is easy to criticize the past... 


"take the log out of your own eye" 


how can we try and judge or fix someone else. when our sight is askew by our own short comings and faults.


Soviet dictator Josef Stalin died 60 years ago, on March 5, 1953. This video, full of archive footage, tells of the life and death of the man who headed the Soviet state for nearly 30 years, leaving a controversial legacy of crimes and victories.


RIA NOVOSTI


Dartagnan: Nowadays many countries like remembering the "crimes" made by Joseph Stalin. YES, It is important to remember the past, the errors&crimes&victories made by Josef Stalin during the first part of the 20 century but it is more important not to repeat them in the 21st century. But Nowadays in the 21st century, these crimes are repeated in many countries where innocent people (children&women) are killed during wars. The fact that we have still wars in the 21st century is due to the fact that we repeat the errors of people&dictators of the first part of the 20 century. 


Nothing has changed, you criticize the old dictators but nowadays we have new dictators. These dictators kill innocent children, women&people everyday. Wars still exist in many countries.


When there is a trouble in the world, it is solved by wars. So let's not criticize Stalin if we made the same errors&crimes everyday in the 21st century.


When you cause the death of only one children in a country because of a war, you are already a murderer. 


MAN IS CRUELER THAN ANY ANIMAL OF OUR PLANET. IT IS THE NATURE OF THE MAN. 


DO YOU THINK WE ARE BETTER THAN STALIN ???? NOOOOOOO


                            

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



CROUCHING TIGER
#49 Posted : Thursday, March 21, 2013 11:30:30 AM(UTC)
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James Herbert obituary

Author and master of the horror genre whose trademark was fear.

http://www.guardian.co.u...013/mar/21/james-herbert


WELCOME TO THE REAL WORLD
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Dartagnan on 3/21/2013(UTC)
Dartagnan
#50 Posted : Sunday, March 31, 2013 7:31:57 AM(UTC)
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                     Russia was many years behind Africa.... 


Dartagnan: A good lesson of History: We should not repeat the errors of history.


What were the consequences of the "Gorbashov Perestroika" for the russian people after few years? 


First, the URSS has been divided in many countries. Second, Millions of Russian people lost their money in the governement bank. It was a disaster for the Russian people because a very strong devaluation of money happened. Third The governement left people without money and food. The shops were empty. The government left people without salaries. Millions of Professors of high level in universities&industries had a salary of 50 dollars per months so the best workers of Russia left the country to develop other countries. 


1% of russian people becomes very rich but sent their money in foreign banks to develop other countries. 


The perestroika also provoked a massive loss of life among Russian people. 


We should remember that the Chernobyl disaster happened during the "Gorbashov Perestroika". 


When you have no money and no job, your life has no meaning, you die easily as a poor man. Russia was many years behind Africa. 


The consequences of "Gorbashov perestroika" were a total disaster for Russia and 99%of Russian people during many years. It destroyed them totally BUT 1% of people became over rich. Finally only this 1% people voted for Gorbashov when he was a candidate at the presidential election in Russia that is why he lost this election. 


United Russia to Gorbachev: we lost country after previous perestroika



Перестройка Михаил Горбачев плакат "Браво"

Mikhail Gorbachev


"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#51 Posted : Wednesday, April 03, 2013 7:18:01 PM(UTC)
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«Meeting the world» through Education


New video: 


http://youtu.be/qQ4SWB8PIs4



"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#52 Posted : Friday, April 26, 2013 6:50:01 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: We have to recognize that the URSS people devoted their lives to save the rest of the world against the Fascism. For example today each family in Russia has lost at least one parent during the WWII. At least 30 millions of people in the URSS have been killed during the WWII.   


Stalingrad battle through eyes of foreign journalists


Флаг Победы над Сталинград Великая Отечественная Война солдат 09.01.1943




A presentation of a new book, titled “The City of Steel”, took place in Moscow on April 26. This book is a collection of
articles by UK and US journalists who were witnesses of the battle of Stalingrad. Namely, these journalists worked for the London-based “Times”, “New York Times”, “New York Herald Tribune”, “Chicago Tribune” and “Boston Globe”.






The battle in the Russian city of Stalingrad (now called Volgograd) from 1942 to 1943 was one of the fiercest battles of WWII.


The articles in this book tell not only about the battle of Stalingrad but also about the life of Soviet people in the rear and the sentiments in the Soviet Union and the world during WWII.


One of the book’s editors, Russian historian Natalya Narochnitskaya, says:


“I believe, it is very timely that such a book has been released. At present, quite a few people are trying to review the role of the Soviet Union in WWII. However, if these skeptics read this book, this would probably free them from their prejudices. What else can be the better evidence than evidence of eyewitnesses?”


“The Soviet Union, on the one side, and the US and the UK, on the other, had very different state structures and ideologies. However, during WWII, they fought against a common enemy, they needed each other. This was not the time to argue over our differences, but the time to unite. In this book, one can find many examples of how friendly our
countries were towards each other during that war.”


Unfortunately, Russian books and newspapers, both in the Soviet time and now, have not said much about the partnership between the Soviet Union, the US and the UK during WWII. The new book, “The City of Steel”, is meant to fill this gap, at least partially.


One of the book’s initiators, Igor Nogaev from the Russian Institute of the US and Canada, says:


“As a rule, Soviet newspapers did not often republish materials from foreign ones. However, the time of WWII was an exception. At that time, reports of foreign journalists from the Soviet Union were widely spread all over the world, and they were often republished in Soviet newspapers as well. It was a great relief to Soviet people to know that their allies morally support them in such hard time.”


“Why does the book tell mainly about the battle of Stalingrad?”, we asked Mr. Nogaev.




 This year marks the 70th anniversary of the battle of Stalingrad. This battle was a turning point in the course of WWII. After it, the situation changed in favor of the Soviet army and its allies. The Nazis never recovered after that battle.


So far, the book has been published only in English. However, it is expected that a Russian translation of it will be presented at an international book fair in Moscow in September.




"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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CROUCHING TIGER on 4/27/2013(UTC)
Dartagnan
#53 Posted : Saturday, April 27, 2013 2:52:05 PM(UTC)
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St Pete to commemorate underage war dead


01.06.1944 Великая Отечественная война дети война сироты война




On May 6th, St Petersburg will unveil a memorial to the Soviet children who lost their lives in World War II.






There were numerous child casualties on the battlefronts, in the ranks of the anti-Nazi resistance movement, in Nazi death camps and in the 900-day Nazi siege of Leningrad between 1941 and 44.


The memorial stands near the Piskarevo Мemorial Cemetery, where Leningrad buried its siege dead in mass graves.


Voice of Russia, Interfax
Читать полностью: http://english.ruvr.ru/2...orate-underage-war-dead/




 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#54 Posted : Monday, May 06, 2013 7:29:03 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: May 09, 1945 is the official day of the end of the WWII in Russia. The unending war where several millions of people were killed. The URSS people lost at least 30 millions people in this unending war. 


During the 1945 Victory Parade in Moscow, people celebrated the end of this unending war.  


VIDEO (in english):


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCWVM5bUZmE



"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



CROUCHING TIGER
#55 Posted : Tuesday, May 07, 2013 1:40:43 PM(UTC)
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Special F/X Pioneer Ray Harryhausen Dies At 92

http://variety.com/2013/...dies-at-92-1200470873/#!1/a-life-size-sculpture-of-special-effects-creator-ray-harryhausen/


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Dartagnan
#56 Posted : Wednesday, May 08, 2013 6:11:06 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: If the URSS were occupied by the Germans, they would have killed all our grand fathers&grand mothers so Maria Sharapova would not exist. 


Victory Celebrations. May 9, 1945. Archive Footage


VIDEO: the announcement of the victory !!!!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpOUxTsEHRA


The Allied victory over Nazi Germany in World War II is marked in Russia on May 9. Watch archive footage of people across the globe celebrating this day back in 1945.


                         


 

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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CROUCHING TIGER on 5/9/2013(UTC)
CROUCHING TIGER
#57 Posted : Thursday, May 09, 2013 2:30:54 AM(UTC)
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http://en.wikipedia.org/...Victory_Day_%289_May%29

About Victory Day...


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CROUCHING TIGER
#58 Posted : Thursday, May 09, 2013 7:55:51 AM(UTC)
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http://rt.com/news/wwii-...ade-victory-moscow-024/

VICTORY DAY PARADE IN MOSCOW...impressive as always...


WELCOME TO THE REAL WORLD
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Dartagnan on 5/9/2013(UTC)
Dartagnan
#59 Posted : Friday, May 24, 2013 5:48:36 PM(UTC)
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Dartagnan: Internet has changed our life. Did it changed it positively or negatively? 


Internet is a new way of "virtual" communication with others but also a reference library.  


Internet addiction driving people nuts?


соцсети дружба друзья добавить в друзья 2011 июнь коллаж




Some people simply can't stop posting, friending and following, i.e. substituting a real life with surrogate feelings and emotions. Psychologists say that Internet addiction is real and they are not overreacting.






This new web-triggered obsession hasn’t so far been classified as a mental disorder, but it’s definitely something serious. Psychologist Olga Serebrovskaya comments.


"I wouldn’t call it a mental disorder as not everyone develops web-dependency. People in general are prone to addictions, like smoking or drinking. Some have a specific addictive personality which means they will inevitably get obsessed with this or that activity.


It’s just a type of personality pathology but a border-line one, so it requires medication only in extreme cases. In all other cases, psychotherapy would do, but usually people are unlikely to go and see a doctor as online communication gives them what they lack offline."


On the other hand, hi-tech progress is unstoppable and social media sites are not that bad being a handier means of communication compared to phones and paper letters. However, this tool can make one dependent and, thus, its use should be balanced. But the humankind has a very short Internet-experience so there is no universal criterion to finding this balance.


The social media are also a great information tool and it’s up to a person how to apply it – either to spend hours online or do something more pleasant.


A couple of years ago Internet dependency would have seemed impossible and have been mocked by the professional community.


Today some experts still think it’s an extreme to compare the Internet to a drug, but TV has already been labeled as one. 


"People go online in search of things they miss in reality – fun, company, attention, the feeling of being wanted. Online communication is easy and less demanding than face-to-face interaction where insincere behavior is hard to hide."


 Some say the Internet is just a trend and will soon become obsolete like it happened to phones. Even if online communication becomes old-fashioned the good old feelings that it transmits will remain and stay the same.





 



"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



Dartagnan
#60 Posted : Sunday, May 26, 2013 8:07:39 AM(UTC)
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Russian House opens Park of Glory in US


Николай Гоголь памятник Гоголю Гоголевский бульвар


Monument to Nikolai Gogol




The grand opening of a unique Park of Glory takes place on May 26 in the U.S. city of Howell, New Jersey.






The park alleys of the city contain 28 monuments to prominent figures of culture and history of Russia: Moscow princes and army leaders Alexander Nevsky and Dmitry Donskoy, founder of Holy Trinity Monastery, later canonized a saint - St. Sergius of Radonezh, Tsar Peter I, prominent poets and writers - Mikhail Lermontov, Nikolai Gogol, Alexander Solzhenitsyn and Vladimir Vysotsky.


 The park was established on the territory of the Russian House Rodina that came up with the initiative for the Park of Glory.


Two days before, on May 24, Russian House Rodina launched its two week-long celebration of Russian Culture with a reception devoted to the Slavonic Literature and Culture Day in memory of Saints Cyril and Methodius, Teachers of the Slavic Peoples.


Celebrations are set to continue until June 8, 2013.



"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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