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London Olympics: when politics matters more than rules
Dartagnan
#1 Posted : Friday, August 03, 2012 12:59:54 PM(UTC)
Dartagnan

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According André Agassi, it is possible to be a champion in the usa and using special drugs for that.


André Agassi wrote a special book about his own experience in doping. Andre Agassi's upcoming autobiography contains an admission he used crystal meth in 1997 and failed a drug test. 


http://sports.espn.go.co...is/news/story?id=4600027


                         


I am always suprised by that performance of the USA swimmers who can win 20 olympic gold medals. It is not possible for a human being without special medecines. Michael Phelps stormed to a 20th Olympic Games medal on Thursday: record in history of sport When I see his face, he doesn't look like a clever person. He doesn't have a high forehead. It is typical for clever persons. 




I am also suprised by the performance of Serena Williams who is doing miracles on tennis courts at the age of 30 years old.


Sport becomes not interesting at all when you see these king of athletes who cheat for a victory. It is unfair.


Anyway Someday we will know the truth about these unfair victories. 


A US coach thinks that Chinese swimmers use drugs: 


Chinese gold medallist hit by doping allegations




Chinese gold medallist hit by doping allegations

China’s swimming star Ye Shiwen wowed spectators after smashing a world record at the Olympic Games in London, but a top US coach Monday called it "suspicious" and alleged that doping was responsible for her success. Shiwen denies the accusation.


By News Wires (text)



 



AFP -  A top US coach Monday called China's Ye Shiwen "suspicious" and compared her to East Germany's drug-addled athletes after her super-fast times were questioned at the London Olympics.


John Leonard, executive director of the World Swimming Coaches Association, told The Guardian that the 16-year-old's lightning freestyle leg in her world-record 400m individual medley swim was simply "impossible".


The schoolgirl timed 58.68sec in the last 100 metres, a whisker off US winner Ryan Lochte's time in the men's competition. Astonishingly, her final lap was quicker than the American champion.


"The one thing I will say is that history in our sport will tell you that every time we see something, and I will put quotation marks around this, 'unbelievable', history shows us that it turns out later on there was doping involved," Leonard told the British newspaper.


"That last 100m was reminiscent of some old East German swimmers, for people who have been around a while. It was reminiscent of the 400m individual medley by a young Irish woman in Atlanta."










 








Leonard was referring to Michelle de Bruin, who emerged as a triple gold-medallist at the 1996 Games but was banned for four years in 1998 for tampering with a urine sample.


"Any time someone has looked like superwoman in the history of our sport they have later been found guilty of doping," he said, adding: "I have been around swimming for four-and-a-half decades now.


"If you have been around swimming you know when something has been done that just isn't right. I have heard commentators saying 'well she is 16, and at that age amazing things happen'. Well yes, but not that amazing. I am sorry."


Ye, whose gold medal swim was described as "insane" by former record-holder Stephanie Rice, has already denied foul play. Late on Monday, she set the world's fastest time in the 200m individual medley semi-finals.


"There is no problem with doping, the Chinese team has a firm policy so there is no problem with that," said the youngster.


Ye won the 200m medley at the world championships last year, but her 400m medley swim shaved seven seconds off her time at that meet. Leonard admitted such an improvement was possible at her age.


"But the final 100m was impossible. Flat out. If all her split times had been faster I don't think anybody would be calling it into question, because she is a good swimmer," he said.


"But to swim three other splits at the rate that she did, which was quite ordinary for elite competition, and then unleash a historic anomaly, it is just not right."


He added: "No coach that I spoke to yesterday could ever recall seeing anything remotely like that in a world level competition.


"Where someone could out-split one of the fastest male swimmers in the world, and beat the woman ahead of her by three-and-a-half body lengths. All those things, I think, legitimately call that swim into question."


Leonard is the first coach to speak out about Ye. British media have also pounced on her performances, pointing to China's record of state-sponsored doping in the 1980s and 1990s.


"Ye's amazing time for freestyle leg scarcely credible," read a headline in The Times, which noted that the youngster was a former team-mate of Chinese swimmer Li Zhesi, who was barred from the Olympics over blood-booster EPO.


"Chinese swimming has such a shameful history of doping that any remarkable achievement by one of its athletes is inevitably met with cynicism," remarked the Daily Telegraph.


But Arne Ljungqvist, medical commission chief for the International Olympic Committee, called the speculation "sad."


"For me, it is very sad that an unexpected performance is surrounded by suspicions," he told a briefing.


"I mean to raise suspicion immediately when you see an extraordinary performance -- to me it is against the fascination of sport."


And Frank Busch, national team director for USA Swimming, compared Ye to Jamaica's Usain Bolt, who surprised the world by winning three track sprint titles in world record times at Beijing 2008.


"I don't know what the Chinese are doing. But I don't think anybody saw Usain Bolt running that fast in 2008. There are times you have phenoms coming up that surprise you with what they can do," he told the New York Times.


China, who only won one swimming gold at Beijing 2008, took two on the first two days in London through Ye and men's 400m freestyle winner Sun Yang.




http://www.france24.com/...-down-doping-accusations

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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alexandreka on 8/7/2012(UTC)
Dartagnan
#2 Posted : Monday, August 06, 2012 9:48:04 AM(UTC)
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London Olympics: when politics matters more than rules




London Olympics: when politics matters more than rules




 

Photo: AFP






As the London Olympics has entered its tenth day, more and more scandals are breaking out on the sidelines of the Games. A US gymnast who failed to perform one of the elements wins silver in the vault final. Heptathlete Tatyana Chernova could have won silver but was left behind by the German team. Experts also argue the disqualification of Russian race-walker Vladimir Kanaikin.




Although the most disputable sports are only about to begin this week, the first half of the Games has already proved scandalous. Shortly after the disqualification of boxers and the performance of Japanese athletes in team`s all-around competitions, another reason has appeared to suspect the judges of bias.


The final of women’s gymnastics event: shortly before the end of the competitions Russian, Romanian, American and German athletes are in the lead. McKayla Maroney of the US takes silver after a fall, leaving Maria Paseka of Russia behind. The two-time Olympics champion Lidia Ivanova is outraged at the decision which she says is politically motivated. This has nothing to do with sports, prominent Russian coach Vitaly Akimov agrees…


"Of course, the decision was biased. After failing to perform one of the two jumps an athlete can in no way become a silver prize winner. When they realized that their judging could cost them their careers, they gave an overrated mark to a Romanian athlete proclaiming her a champion. Of course, a silver medal should have been awarded to a Russian gymnast. A similar incident took place during figure skating competitions at the 2010 Vancouver Games: the judges then also gave overrated marks to some athletes and downgraded those earned by Russians."


Race walking is where Russians are traditionally strong. Nevertheless, Vladimir Kanaikin, one of the favorites of the 20-km race, was disqualified after receiving three red cards.Ding Chen of China received only one warning, although experts saw him violating the rules more than once during the race. But the Chinese race walker was so confident of winning that started waving his hands long before the finish line. Valery Borchin of Russia tried to catch up with Chen but collapsed due to a heat stroke. Due to some reasons, it took medics some time to give Borchin first aid which also sparked tensions among members of the Russian delegation. Editor-in-chief for the All Sports agency, Andrei Mitkov believes that national federations could have affected the judges during both the race walking and the gymnastics competitions.


"Just look what is going on: Russia`s Olympic champion suffers a heat stroke, another athlete, Kanaikin, is disqualified after three warnings, despite the fact that two Chinese athletes who won gold and silver were almost running. This is what always happens when international federation and national Olympic committees interfere."


Expert says the most telling is a scandal with women’s heptathlon, when the results were showing Russia’s Tatiana Chernova winning a silver medal. After the German delegates argued the disqualification of their athlete things went worse. In view of this, the only thing the Russian delegation can do about it is to become as persistent as their rivals.



http://english.ruvr.ru/2...matters-more-than-rules/

"I'd love to open a tennis school for children in my hometown of Sochi." said Sharapova Maria.



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alexandreka on 8/7/2012(UTC)
paul_pipkin
#3 Posted : Tuesday, August 07, 2012 1:14:10 AM(UTC)
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Thanks, Dart. So true--the national federations of Russia & other Eastern countries need to get together & raise hell.


Of course, if China pulls out the most medals, they'll be happy.


But the Winter Games & the next Summer Games will be held in BRICS nations. May be a different story.

"That's the way the world works... right now." --Maria Sharapova at 17
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Dartagnan on 8/7/2012(UTC)
vampares`
#4 Posted : Friday, August 10, 2012 5:13:06 AM(UTC)
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Attitudes towards performance enhancement of any kind have been negative over recent years. Traditionally, there was at least unbiased sentiment regarding, say, "advancement as an athlete".

Take something as simple as my soy milk. I like the fact that there are no GMO's involved. But there are "additives". Things that are added in small quantities for my benefit healthwise. I cannot buy soy milk in any other form short of brewing it myself. These little things slipped in -- on a regular basis -- are often overlooked while alternative supplements are given screwtiny and observed as some sort of crime.

Ephedrine is an example of where whining *drugs,drugs,drugs* remove a perfectly valid herbal extract from the US market.

In the mean time there are plenty of other things on that shelf that people have very little knowledge of. People with little knowledge should not need to uproot every last thing that they felt was a bothersome burden.
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